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Thread: Building a bog -- question

  1. #1
    sda
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    Okay, so after a couple years of lugging HUGE undrained pots of CPs in and out of the house every spring and fall, I've decided to build a bog in my back yard to just leave the plants in year-round (plus most of my pitcher plants and cobrar lilies are really spreading, so I need more room, anyway). Its a very nice location -- small yard, completely fenced in by a six-foot tall white vinyl fence (so no stray critters other than squirrels and birds), and a large tree (bog location will get 1/2 to 3/4 day of sun, though). My question is this: can I transplant my CPs now (American pitcher plants, Venus flytraps, cobra lilies, and temperate sundews are going into the bog), or is it best that I wait until fall as the plants start to go dormant (or even next spring before the plants come out of dormancy?). Oh, and I know that I'll need to provide additional shelter for the cold winter months -- probably will cover the bog with a tarp and then a thick layer of straw or leaves.

    Ideas? Suggestions? I'm in zone 6 or upstate/western New York. Its been ungodly HOT and humid here the past couple weeks. If I transplant now should I at least wait for the heat to break?

    Thanks.

    - Scott

  2. #2

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    I would wait in Transplanting until spring, right when before they come out of dormancy.
    \"Are you suggesting coconuts migrate?\"

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  3. #3
    jack's Avatar
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    I would wait until spring also, no reason to take chances. Have you thought about putting your plants in your bog in thier containers? You would get an idea about were to place your plants, the amount of light they will get, and if you see problems arise that you didn't think about there much easier to move. I have mine in a bog but left them in there containers and its worked great for me. Somtimes I can even believe I'm in a bog in the Carolinas . Jack
    'Celebrate the birth of our nation by blowing a little piece of it up'.The Simpsons.
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  4. #4
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    The Sarracenia and Sundew are ok to transplant, but the VFT suffers from shock...to get around that what you can do is turn your pot upsidedown and remove it all ( dirt and plant ) that way you don't disturb the roots ( that is what will shock it ). As long as the roots aren't exposed and/or played with, the shock will be little to none.

    The cobra lily needs a constant soucre of cold water running over the roots, so it may not be wise to plant that in a bog...they are a better indoor plant.( my opinion )

    In the winter, you got it, just cover... Placing like you said leaves or even covering it with a blanket ( tucking them in for the winter ) wouldn't be bad. You just want to keep the roots from freezing.

    I know that Nepenthes Gracilis has an outdoor bog that does fine with his S. purpuera.

    I also know that Tony Paroubek is in New York as well ( although I don't know if he grows outside ).

    Although I am in Texas ( Houston ) and I know that things are different, I am working on a bog right now, and I plan on leaving the plants in ground...

    Anyway, to make a long story longer, I think you would be safe planting them into the ground ( as long as you use the right soil; peat moss, sand ). Just take the whole plant out and try your best not to distrub the roots. You may still witness some shock, but the plants should be fine.

  5. #5
    sda
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    Thanks for all the great comments. I planned to try to disturb all the roots as little as possible, so I guess we're on the same track. The first few years I lugged the heavy pots down into the basement. The first year I lost my S. Purpureas, but everything else did really well (maybe the purps didn't get cold enough for their dormancy? Or maybe they were too dry? I don't know....). Last year I put the pots in a new unfinished (uninsulated) porch I was having built on the house. Most everything came through fine, even though to my dismay the pots froze SOLID on a couple occassions (did lose a leucophylla and a minor, though). That's why I figured I'd save myself a LOT of trouble and just build a bog (have wanted one for a very long time, anyway). This will be a more "natural" dormancy for the plants, anyway, rather than a musty basement or a dry porch.

    As for my cobras -- I've always had them in pots, and only ever pour cold water over them when it gets really hot. Most of the time they just get the same rain water (or distilled in the dry season) as the rest of the pots of CPs, and they have flourished for me the past few years (got more flowers this year than ever). So I think if I maybe plant them in the deepest part of the bog, and make sure to give them some shade, they should be alright. And if I don't plant anything near them I should still be able to give them a drink of ice water on really hot summer days. I may also busy some big rocks or bricks beneath them, to hold in the cooler temperatures.

    Thanks,

    Scott

  6. #6
    Moderator Schmoderator Fluorescent fluorite, England PlantAKiss's Avatar
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    Hi Sda

    Welcome to the forums!

    Just a little warning...you WILL have problems with the squirrels. They tear up my microbog on a daily basis. They just love to dig around the base of the plants (tearing up or exposing roots) and even chew on the pitchers themselves. Everyone here has heard my squirrel woes.

    This my first little bog but all my VFTs and sarras did fine outside in their pots over the past winter barring the squirrel attacks. We had temps down in the low teens and most of the s. purpureapitchers remained in good shape (nice maroony purple) and some of theVFTs did as well. They can take quite cold temperatures.

    I am going to try garlic at the base of the plants...I just read on the web that works. But I don't know. They are very destructive critters...only cute when they are running around in the trees.

    Good luck with your bog!

    Suzanne
    "Fox terriers are born with about four times as much original sin in them as other dogs." - Jerome K. Jerome

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