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Thread: "seedlings dont need dormancy"

  1. #9

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    Pyro,
    You make a good point but the problem is I have only been growing these a year and all of mine came in so there is nothing to compare to. I will certainlly have lots to compare to next spring though.
    I remain a man obsessed with a genus
    Brooks

  2. #10
    VFT and Drosera lover vft guy in SJ's Avatar
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    Hey Brooks... is that a Judith Hindle? It looks very similar to mine.. My limited background of Sarracenia makes it difficult for me to ID them.

    Thanks
    Steve
    There are only 2 infinite things... the universe and human stupidity, and I'm not too sure about the universe.

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    Steve,
    It is not Judith Hindle. It is an unknown hybrid, a moorei cross I believe, too soon to tell.
    I remain a man obsessed with a genus
    Brooks

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    Herenorthere sent me 2 1 1\2 year old s.leucopila that didn`t go through dormancy that are 1 foot tall,and he also sent me a 1 1\2 year old hybrid that did go through dormancy and its only 2 inches tall! Now my question can i now grow the hybrid this winter without a dormancy? p.s Thanks again herenorthere!
    [img]http://home.**********.com/users/pondboy/Neps/Neps%20sig..JPG[/img]

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    Quote (Alvin Meister @ Aug. 27 2003,10:25)
    In the same way that tissue cultured plants, you can give them dormancy if you want and that is what they would experience in the wild. However they apparently grow up faster if you skip it, and I believe John Brittacher on the ICPS website [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/smile.gif[/img][/QUOTE]


    Phil Faulisi Made a new hybrid around the year 2000. He did not skip dormancy ANY year. guess how big the plant is at 3 years old... over 2 1/2 feet!! [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/wow.gif[/img] Now, I doubt I'd ever be able to get a plant to 2 1/2 feet by skipping dormancy for the first 2 years... [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/confused.gif[/img]

    Ok, so maybe for some it speeds up growth, and for some it doesn't... maybe dormancy speeded up growth for phil 'cause he grows plants so well [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/wink.gif[/img] [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/wink.gif[/img]

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    Arrow

    I'm not a botanist but here is my theory on why the young plants don't need a dormancy period.

    During the normal growing period, the plant slowly stores up nutrients and chemicals for the winter. These could possibly be for surviving frosts, or the give it the ability to grow rapidly after the winter. Think of it as 'fat' in a way. If not given a period to use this 'fat' the chemicals in fact can build up to a point where they can slow the growth of the plant if not poison itself. (ie a little fat is good, a lot of fat is bad)

    On the other hand the seedlings are too small to have built up a significant amount of this fat (think surface area ratio to volume) so they aren't as affected by it. Also since it takes a good year for a plant to know where in the year it is, it can be 'fooled' to delay storing this fat and put more effort into growth.

    Well I think its plausible, I just need a couple botanists and chemical engineers to verify it for me. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/wink.gif[/img]

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    INTERESTING THEROY J BUT A BOTANIST FRIEND OF MINE EXPLANINED WHY SOME PLANTS ARE BETTER AT SURVIVING FROST THAN OTHERS. IT HAS TO DO WITH CONVERTING FOOD TO SUGAR AS THE TEMPS GRADUALLY GET LOWER AS FALL COMES ON. YOU SEE SUGAR WATER FREEZES AT A LOWER TEMP THEN JUST WATER. THINK OF IT AS ANTI-FREEZE FOR PLANTS. AN EXAMPLE WOULD BE A BEET THAT GETS SWEETER AFTER A FROST, MORE SUGARS. THIS STILL DOES NOT ANSWER THE QUESTION AS TO WHY THE SEEDLINGS CAN DO WITHOUT A DORMANCY. ANYBODY?
    I remain a man obsessed with a genus
    Brooks

  8. #16

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    I would say they don't need dormancy because they are quite a lot different from the adult plants. They don't grow at specific times, such as S. leucophylla and every seedling grows continually without a rest. Their main job is to store up energy and create a rhizome store and the larger they become the more surface area they have for photosynthesis. At some point they must become like the adult plants and behave like their respective species, but seedlings are not like the adults. So perhaps the answer is 'just because they are seedlings'?
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