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Thread: Why aren't Darlingtonia posts under "Quasi-carnivr

  1. #9

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    Another interesting thing about Roridula is that the "glue" produced by this plant is very strong from what I have read. Here are some pics of Roridula with prey from Martin's website(www.drosphyllum.com): R.gorgonias with prey
    R.dentata with prey
    Another pic

  2. #10

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    To call the Darlingtonia plant a quasi-carnivore is a nonsense. OK it may not produce enzymes, but does benefit by deliberately attracting,trapping, killing and finally absorbing nutrients DIRECTLY from captured prey where roridula does not..
    Best Regards

    Mike King

    NCCPG National collection holder of Sarracenia

    http://www.carnivorousplants.uk.com

  3. #11

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    Hi Mike,

    What do you mean by "Directly"? Do you mean that Roridula is quasi-carnivorous because the Pameridea insects digest the prey or because the nutrients are absorbed via the stomata?

  4. #12
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    Guys, with regards to these "quasi-carnivores," what's the difference between having bacteria doing the digestion or a larger organism (assassin bug) doing the digestion?

    I think you can call a plant carnivorous if it has evolved to attract, trap and kill with the intent of getting nourishment from the carcass. The means by which the plant attains the nutrients is mute. The cobra attract, trap and kill. I know Roridulas trap and kill, but do they lure? I'm unfamiliar with this genus, so I don't know if they have a sent or something that attracts prey.
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    [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html312/non-cgi/emoticons/smile.gif[/img] I do believe that the issue is sort of silly, because the newer definitions state that they must trap and kill. With an attempt at attrating OR opertunistic traping. If a relative of the plant produces digestive enzyms or the plant is host to a symbiotic organism that helps with the digestion it counts as being able to digest prey. That is why some of the older suedo's are being reclassified right now [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html312/non-cgi/emoticons/smile.gif[/img] And it should also be noted, the key feature looked for currently is the presence of an adaptation within the trap to let the plant absorb the nutrients. At least according to my 2003 addition of my GIGA bio book. If I had it here I would quote, but it's at school...

    ... I've also read no one has ever looked at Cobra's morphology enough to determin what the inside of the traps can do, so it may actually secreat digestive enzyms opertunistically and we just don't know it yet
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  6. #14
    Nepenthes Specialist nepenthes gracilis's Avatar
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    Well If a plant is luring bugs to it regardless of what it is and it benefits from them after they have been broken down into simpler elements then I say it qualifys as carnivorous. So you can look at my theory as this:

    Qualities of being a CP:

    1.) Plant must lure some sort of potential prey.
    2.) Plant must have a way to digest/break down prey.
    3.) Plant must benefit from prey.
    4.) Plant must continue carnivory.

    My .02 cents.




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    Hi Schloaty,

    Roridula lures its prey in the same way that Drosera lures its prey. I do not recall either genera utilizing scent as a lure, but I may be wrong. Roridula seems to attract bugs quite well as evidenced by the photos in my previous posts. I have heard of cases where growers had to remove the insects trapped on Roridula to prevent fungus when they did not have any Pameridea bugs.

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