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Thread: Don schnell's book

  1. #9

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    also, any other good books?

  2. #10
    Moderator Schmoderator Fluorescent fluorite, England PlantAKiss's Avatar
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    You just need to bear in mind that cultivating techniques can vary. Sometimes you need to experiment and see what works for you in your particular location. There are people here who "break the rules" and quite successfully grow their plants. So...simply put, don't think you have to grow any CP exactly according to The Savage Garden just because "it says so in the book." You may find a different technique works for you that varies from what Peter D'Amato says. I'm not putting the book down at all...its a great book and I have it myself. Just don't think its the FINAL WORD on growing CPs. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile.gif[/img] Read other books, surf the internet for information...and then draw your own conclusions from all the information you gather for what cultivation techniques you'd like to try.

    I believe it was Pyro once who told me how he grows his cobra lilies and it was nothing like the "accepted technique" and he said they grow just fine.

    I think if you try some different methods, you'll find there are many ways to grow these plants well. Experimentation leads to new knowledge.



    "Fox terriers are born with about four times as much original sin in them as other dogs." - Jerome K. Jerome

  3. #11
    Copper's Avatar
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    Mine was $28
    I am just like a Super Hero, but without the power or motivation.................and the funky suit.

  4. #12

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    basically I am looking for growing conditions...what their wild environments are like. ie, the d. adalae are grow in mostly shaded areas. I need to know what sort of conditions they grow in in the wild. Yeah, the Savage Garden, albeit a good book, I find it leaves much to be desired. I've been doing cps now for about a year and a half (I'm obsessed with well over 200 plants, and about another 25 coming) and there are things that are stated to work that don't and vice versa. It was frustrating to learn the hard way when the book says to do it this way and it simply does not work. It was hard to learn, and even harder to get away from. Now I don't care, I follow a basic guideline, and experiment. I have several types of mediums growing. I have plants of all types in all different types of conditions. Typical conditions, shaded, bright sun etc. I document the results in my head and go from there. There is nothing like finding your own 'best' way. thanks for the help.

  5. #13
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    When I began this hobby last summer and purchased what turned out to be Drosera spatulata an P. primuliflora, I went to Borders and Barnes & Noble to find CP books. One had Savage Garden and the other had CP's Of NA. every chance I had I read through them. At the time, beyond basic care, the enormity of the species out there and pictures of pitcher plants, butterworts and sundews looking pretty much alike was overwhelming. However, since latching onto TF, I am no longer overwhelmed by the info in those books. Now they make sense. They are both good guides for those who are relatively new and a little beyond. They are great for people with, dare I say, intermediate knowledge of caring for CP's. Folks like Tamlin, PAK, Bugweed, Seandew, Vic Brown, Pinguiculaman, etc..., who have been growing CP's for decades now, have moved on to their own techniques that differ from Mr. D'Amato & Mr. Schnell. Those books are still quite valuable guides for many of us, with huge learning curves. CP's Of the World, when I saw that one in a different Borders, is one of those "gotta have it" book. Someday...

  6. #14
    Moderator Schmoderator Fluorescent fluorite, England PlantAKiss's Avatar
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    [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_k_ani_32.gif[/img] Ummm...you can leave me out of that "decades" classification. lol I wish! I wish I did know as much as all those others folks you put me in with! I still consider myself a newbie as I learn new things all the time. And every time you think you've "got it!"--a plant keels over on you and you don't know why. Just nature's way of putting you in your place and making sure you don't get too nice guyy about yer plants. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/biggrin.gif[/img]

    One of the best ways to learn about cultivating a particular plant is to research its location and native environment. Then try to mimic that as best you can. Books are fun and interesting...but will never be the "end all be all" of plant growing. Like Bob said...he reads, he experiments and finds out what works well for him. Even here on the forum...you can ask a question and get 10 different answers...which goes to show you one method doesn't work the same for all.

    The books are always fun to read though. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile.gif[/img]
    "Fox terriers are born with about four times as much original sin in them as other dogs." - Jerome K. Jerome

  7. #15

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    Yes, the best plan is to get as many opinions as possible, and I usually favor those techniques that work for growers in areas similar to my own.

    PAK is very correct, finding out where a species grows and doing a websearch on the climatic conditions there can make all the difference in the world to success in cultivation.

    Close observation and care of the plants is really the best strategy for any grower to use. If they are growing, let them be. If not try to change single variables like light or water slowly and observe the results. Go with what works, not what the books say. If you fail, offer the information so that others can learn what not to do. Failures often carry very useful data if they are communicated.
    "Grow More, Share More"

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