User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 8 of 15

Thread: Plant dormancy outside

  1. #1

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    winchester va
    Posts
    332
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I have around fifty or so potted cps that will require dormancy this winter. everything from s. psittancia, to your typical vfts. I was thinking of after I roto till my garden under, just making room for them in the garden and mulching them at ground level with whatever is lying around. If anyone has done this or something similar, what are the pros and cons here? I wonder about soil moisture, but I suppose that if they are 'planted' to pot level, that wouldn't be a problem. mother nature would take care of that. I figure this method would be easier than keeping them in a terra in the outside garage and having to worry about soil moisture. any thoughts are appreciated...

  2. #2
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Western New York
    Posts
    18,768
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Being a little north of you, I will be in the sme boat, asking the same question, soon. I seem to remember someone from northern New England having success in providing dormancy for Sarrs, Darlingtonia, and VFT's by heavy mulching. I'll bet Nepenthes Gracilis or Tony or Tamlin has done this successfully.

  3. #3
    SirKristoff is a poopiehead Ozzy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Greenswamp, NC
    Posts
    13,747
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I don't think you'll see any problems. I have an outside bog and I'm 1000 ft from Lake Erie. Everything didn't survive last year but most things did.

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Manchester, Connecticut
    Posts
    628
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Heya - Jim & everyone

    It was me. I'm in Connecticut where we get lots of snow & freezing temps in the winter. Here's what I did last October & it worked very well - only lost 2 of 100 or so plants.

    1. I built an 8 foot by 4 foot raised garden bed.
    2. Started collecting lots of pine needles. A garbage bag or two full.
    3. Then I filled the raised bed with FREE compost from our local recycling center.
    3. A day or two before dormancy I sprayed down all the plants with a fungicide (powder you mix with water) using a 2 gallon pump style garden sprayer.
    4. I scooped out little holes and placed all the plants (pots and all) in the raised bed, packing the soil around the pots. I tried to put the tenderest plants in the center.
    5. Sprayed all plants with fungicide, again.
    6. Strew pine needles over all the plants, about an inch thick layer.
    7. Placed a large sheet of burlap (over the whole bed) on top of the pine needle layer.
    8. Shoveled on a 1 foot deep layer of wood chips on top of the burlap the first week (again = FREE from our recycling center ).
    9. The following week added another foot of wood chips.

    When spring rolled around, I would remove a few inches of the wood chips as the weather warmed up. One suggestion John Phillip (NECPS Prez) suggested was to use pine boughs instead of wood chips because you just don't know what's in the stuff from your recycling center - stuff that could cause disease or otherwise damage your plants.

    I hope this helps everone.

    WildBill

    PS: Moderators - feel free to copy or pin this under an appropriate topic/article/section.

  5. #5
    Copper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Hastings NE
    Posts
    2,215
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I have an outside bog here and it has survived the freeze of Nebraska. My soil mix is standard for a bog. I covered the bog with some hay and it did wonderfully. I lost nothing.

    I also keep a terrarium near a window in the basement. It is insulated against the warmth of the house. Everything survived there as well. I have not tried the refrigerator method.
    I am just like a Super Hero, but without the power or motivation.................and the funky suit.

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Oswego, New York, U.S.A.
    Posts
    5,290
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I overwinter my temperate plants in an unheated basement, largely as aquatics (except for Drosera) with good results.
    "Grow More, Share More"

  7. #7
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Western New York
    Posts
    18,768
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'm glad to see some variety of approach and same bottom line success.

    Bill: As i was reading through I was thinking that this was "pinned" material. But ya didn't hear it from me. Certainly, it should be added to favorites, under "sagely CP advice."

    Thank you one and all.

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Manchester, Connecticut
    Posts
    628
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hey everyone -

    I just put things into outdoor dormancy for the winter. I'm in zone 5 and we have already had freezing temperatures. Here are pics that go with the previous posting.

    Plants in the 8 foot by 4 foot bed, just sprayed with fungicide:


    Pine Needles:


    Pine Boughs:


    Burlap:


    Mulch:


    The dogs already think it's their new playground, which by the way, didn't seem to hurt the plants last year. I will likely add another 10 inches or so of mulch. Hope this helps everybody.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •