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Thread: Here's a list of seed ordered, need instructions

  1. #9

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    Whoops sorry....

    I purchase Long-fibred sphagnum at Home Depot (not Green Moss as that can be toxic to plants). It's about $4-5 for a small and $20-24 for a large one.

  2. #10
    N=R* fs fp ne fl fi fc L Pyro's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (LauraZ5 @ Oct. 29 2004,1:26)]So what I am gathering is that this other person, "Alan", is going to send me seed that is so old its viability is questionable and now I am going to have a teacher with a bunch of kids sitting there looking at baggies and trays of nothingness other than soil?
    Not necessarily. Not all the seed on Allen's list is old. And, as others have stated, some seed (like Sarr seed) is more robust. Odds are some of it will germinate I just would not expect 100% germination.

    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]Great. I am beginning to feel as if I am darned if I do and darned if I don't.
    I wouldn't feel that way. You are doing your best and that is what is most important. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile.gif[/img]

    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]
    Where do I get longfibered sphagnum moss?
    Kirk mentioned HD but I also find it at Lowes. Look for Orchid Moss. Or just try an online search.

    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]
    Thanks for your help. What's the deal on D. linearis? Are we talking a double dormancy seed? Does it maybe need scarification or something
    No though it does need a longer dormancy, being native to the great lakes region. The deal with D. linearis is that it is not your typical CP. Most CPs like acidic soil (pH less than 7) which is why we use peat moss and LFS as media for them. D. linearis grows in soil that is alkaline (pH greater tha 7) so peat is somewhat toxic to it, hence the very different media I suggested.
    'My love was science- specifically biology and, more specifically, when placed in a common jar, which of two organisms would devour the other.'

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  3. #11

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    Ooooooooh, I wouldnt reccomend D.linearis at all.....
    Its hard to grow. And germinate

    I also wouldnt reccoemd S.leucophylla and S.minor.
    They coem from hot places in the U.S and are not very hardy.

    I odnt knwo about the hardiness of all the rubras, tho rubra subsp. jonesii is very hardy.
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  4. #12
    Moderator Schmoderator Fluorescent fluorite, England PlantAKiss's Avatar
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    Hey Laura

    Why don't you make a post on the Trade Forum? Give a little explanation of your project. Describe the weather/temp/seasons your bogs will be growing in and ask for donations of appropriate plants and/or seeds for your project. Then post your address and see what might arrive. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile.gif[/img]

    People would be free to give or not as they feel. And you wouldn't have to worry as much about old seed. The kind and generous membership here are always giving seeds and plants away so why not direct some to an educational project?

    Give it a try and don't feel bad about taking the plants or seeds. All you need to do is sometime in the future, when you can propagate your plants, you give plant material away three times and ask that the receiver does the same. That keeps the cycle going. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile.gif[/img]

    Also, if you have concerns about some plants surviving dormancy, you can always leave your plants potted, but sink the pots in the bog. That way, they will look natural but come really cold weather, you can always pull the pots up and store the plants in a more protected area til spring.

    Suzanne



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  5. #13
    Moderator Schmoderator Fluorescent fluorite, England PlantAKiss's Avatar
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    Oh...one more thing. I've seen Spanish moss sold as "Orchid Moss" so just make sure what you are buying is longfibered sphagnum moss (LFS) which is totally different than Spanish moss. Canadian is good and so is Chilean. Wisconsin tends to be rather rooty and weedy.



    "Fox terriers are born with about four times as much original sin in them as other dogs." - Jerome K. Jerome

  6. #14

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    The DeKalb county oreophila will be from DeKalb county Alabama. The oreos from there are nicely heavily veined.

    There's no 'right' way to sow the sarracenia seeds but the general consensus is that they grow better in live sphagnum moss. The downside of this though is that it can easily smother the seedlings, even up to a year or so after germination. An easier method is to use 100% moss peat/perlite in a 2:1 mixture, or live sphagnum moss with a thin layer of peat on the top.

    Personally I stratify by wrapping the seeds in wet paper towel, covering with foil and putting them in the fridge for exactly 5 weeks.
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  7. #15
    Moderator Schmoderator Fluorescent fluorite, England PlantAKiss's Avatar
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    I know a lot of folks use the paper towel method. I like my way mostly because I don't have to transfer the seeds anywhere else to germinate them. I can take the container out of the fridge and its ready to go. I can leave the seedlings in the container until they are large enough to transfer to a small pot. And the milled sphag doesn't tend to regenerate and grow so the seedlings are safe.

    But everyone has their favored way of doing things. As long as it works, it doesn't really matter. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile.gif[/img] You could perhaps add some scientific interest to the project by trying stratification in several different ways and see if one way produces germination more quickly than another...or if the germination rate is higher. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile.gif[/img]
    "Fox terriers are born with about four times as much original sin in them as other dogs." - Jerome K. Jerome

  8. #16

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    Hi Laura,

    D. linearis is a difficult Drosera species. Although I have not cultivated it, I have spoken with growers who have it growing successfully, but it is always outdoors in a suitable habitat. The problem is in the overwintering of the yearlings. Like the more arctic forms of D. alglica the plants form hibernacula in the fall to overwinter. In the spring, typically, these open into active growth, but a month later they inevitably reform hibernacula, weaken and die.

    I think other than this species most of the others will present no greater or lesser difficulty if you have a goood growing protocol in place, and this is a great place to learn it.

    In general, CP of all genera want high humidity to germinate. You can read my "take" on seed sowing in the Article forum under seed sowing. My protocol works well for me, and although I predominently grow Drosera it should apply to most CP's. Asking more specific questions on the appropriate forum for the genus will also bring many tips.

    Yes, there are some issues with seed freshness in Lowrie's catalog. He obviously does not update his master list ( some items have remained on there for over a decade), but I hear good reports from items ordered from his update list. I can't say more than what I have heard though since I will not do business with him. The issue of Lowrie's seed freshness, proper ID and his wild collecting of Australian Drosera tubers is a rather hotly debated topic on public forums and I do not care to become involved with either his business or the debate regarding the ethics surrounding it.

    One of the best efforts a person can make is toward educating future generations to the wonder and NEED that CP have. These fragile species need all the help they can get. I believe that the only way they will survive as something other than images in a book or on a tube is if the successive generations of good growers steward the plants. Teaching the cultivation requirements of these species, and also the good habits of proper recording of the plants is a good work, and one that members here unanimously support.

    We are all in it together for the fun of the plants, but also as serious stewards of some very threatened species. There is a nobility in caring for these plants that is unmatched in horticulture. I believe that the finest and best qualities can be found in most Cper's, and the best of these qualities is generosity and sharing. This is why forums like this are such a fine gift (Thanks again, Phillip).

    What I am trying to say is don't feel badly about taking something for free. It is to a higher end and a greater good. If everone shared openely and freely, just think of how we could spread these plants! If you teach anything, I encourage you teach this ethic. A rare thing can engender 2 responses: one is to protect and nurture it. The other response is to capitalize on it's rarity. By the laws of supply and demand, one school wants to see it spread far and wide, the other would just as soon see the material kept rare since it brings greater profit. Most of us here are of the same mind. We want this material to spread to as many growers as we can encourage and support to take up the Stewardship. Between us, there is one Collection held in trust. The only thing that puts limits on what you can hope to have and grow are only considerations of your own space and skills! We work hard at keeping money out of the equation, and focusing on out mutual deep seated love and regard for these species.
    If you have the space, the skills and the love then all will come to you, and with blessings!

    I wish you the best in teaching, and hope you inspire another generation to carry on the work and the art of CP cultivation.
    "Grow More, Share More"

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