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Thread: Just how much can a plant take?

  1. #9
    Whats it to ya? Finch's Avatar
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    i dunno, not much u can do about heat with extended dry humidity.
    that makes no logic

  2. #10
    SirKristoff is a poopiehead Ozzy's Avatar
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    I think I'm the person that you're thinking about. I have a bog in Ohio (about 2000 ft from the shore of Lake Erie). This is the second winter that I have it. I have numerous pitcher plants, sundews and VFT's. Some of the sundews only come back from seeds. I've had a few red dragons vft's that didn't make it last year, but that's about it.
    It gets colder in NC than most of you would believe. I lived in the warmest part of NC, near the SC boarder on the coast. The record low there was 0 f in 1989. There was also 13 inches of snow on the ground. All 20 of the cp species that grow there survived. The biggest factor in them surviving is that it doesn't stay that cold long.Within a week the temps were back up in the 30's and 40's. Another factor was the snow on the ground. Snow acts as an insulator. So the snow actually helped the plants survive.
    The big question is, will plants survive prolong exposure to the weather in the northern part of the country. The answer to that question is, it depends on the specie. I would say most can survive, at least a few years. CP species that will survive this climate is limited to pitcher plants, vft's, sundews, butterworts and bladderworts. Will Darlingtonia survive? I have not done it successfully, but I think it's possible.
    Another thing you need to keep in mind, just because a plant survives one or two winters don't mean it can survive long term. The cold weather and shorter growing period can weaken it enough to make it more prone to drought, disease ect.
    Some plants can't survive, but set seeds and return from seeds.

    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]I had them mulched under 3" of reptile cedar bedding
    Cedar is poisonous to most reptiles.

  3. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (rattler_mt @ Dec. 22 2004,12:46)]S. purpurea is not Darlintonia. that said you would be surprised how well some cobras can survive "less than ideal" conditions. mine is sitting in WARM water in PURE peat in 70-80 degrees EVERY day and is quite happy. there is no reason not to experiment. especially with a TC grown Darlintonia. they arent rare so if yah loose it its not THAT big of a deal. go ahead and try it.
    Yeah I can attest to the durability of some cobras surviving less the ideal conditions. My cobras were fr the longest time planted in pure peat and left in an Ohio sun during summer where temperatures rose into the high 90s for a few day and they grew great. You knowI am thinking about buying a couple hundred seed of Darlingtonia and planting them as that could have a greater effect on their survival then planting adult grown greenhouse plants which have adapted to perfectly ideal conditions. Environment has a lot to do with plant/animal adaptation. Sort of like that one variety of S. Purpurea that grows in alkaline bogs and exhibits certain characteristics but when grown in under acidic conditions becomes a regular purp. So I am thinking if you were to grow a Cobra from seed not onl would you have more genetic diversity to et more cold hardy genes but the plants would be more adaptive as they would have been exposed to the environment from birth. Overal I think this is an interesting experiment.

  4. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]Cedar is poisonous to most reptiles.
    Oh. Must not have been cedar, then, as it was sold specifically as reptile bedding. They were red woodchips, at any rate. Thanks, Ozzy, for the clarification.
    17 Nash Rd.
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  5. #13
    rattler's Avatar
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    schoalty, it was probably fir or cypress. if it was for herps it DEFINATLY wasnt cedar. i have killed several "Lowes" Darlingtonia my recent one is from Tim over on the CPUK forums. his plants are "hard" grown in a greenhouse. it started out as a lil bitty clump that had no problems adapting to household humidity, i think i have had sundews have a harder time adapting to my conditions. i think your seed idea has merit and is worth a try.
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  6. #14
    God must have an interesting sense of humor Wesley's Avatar
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    I'm gonna back up ozzy first, the Carolinas can surprise you. We just recently had records. it was -2*F at my house(extreme western NC), it was in th single digits down at the coast, and no snow for insulation.

    Now for al, genetics is a hariy subject. These are tc plants, not "homegrown/wild" plants. TC does mess up and you can get some different plants, but they cannot survive what wild plants can survive. If you are wanting a cold hardy plant, you want seed and you want to try for a plant that grows in higher/colder climates. They will have a better chance at living, but the seed will also have their parental characteristics, and some of its own. Some will be lucky and live, and some will not live. Those that live will be lucky to make it to flowering age. If you get good seed set, those could be a little more adaptive than their parents... if your lucky. Some might call this evloving some might, I call it adapting. I'm not trying to discourage, I'm motivating you, if you can some that can survive, that could mean great things, and lot of people would benefit from your experiment.
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  7. #15
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    Well, if I am not to take you literally on your plant selection, yes, I think plants can survive a lot better than we give them credit for. I do have a bog in the back, and although cobra does not survive through the year every other plant, sarracenia, I have planted has. I have added some intermedia and filiformis to it this year and I will let you know the outcome. Rotundifolia survives well. Tonight is a good test as it is dropping to about -7. It did that last year for a couple of days and everything survived.

    Through experience, however, I do know that you should not jump more than a couple of zones and if you do jump zones make sure to mulch. It is truley amazing what plants can survive. I think capensis is a good example. It can be frozen and come back from the roots later, or adelae which can be cooked and come back from the roots later.

    I think experimenting is fine, especially since I am doing it in my own bog. Next year I am going to add a ping and some utricularia.
    I am just like a Super Hero, but without the power or motivation.................and the funky suit.

  8. #16

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    Ok I have been doing lots of digging going through zoning charts record lows, average lows, checking counties and what not and I have found what I believe is the absolute bottom of the barrel negative temperature range Darlingtonia can survive. Darlingtonia are known to live and thrive on MT Eddy and Mt Shasta in Northern California. It is there where I started doing my fact digging research. As I stated before the record low for Florence Oregon (Darlingtonia State Park) is around 9*F. I however thought they could survive colder and apparently so. In Shasta California the record low is -13* F Now to me that is pretty impressive. Now my area of Ohio is a zone 6 which means out average annual low is between 0*F- minus 10*F. IN fact I have only known of 2 times our temperature has ever dropped lower in my life time. Once in 1994 when our record low was -25*F and another time a couple years ago. Now I plan on mulching my Darlingtonia which will further insulate them from the cold. It is my understanding that the actual cold does not hurt plants. It's actually cold wind that can hurt them. So right now I have a hypothesis that Darlingtonia could probably survive brief temperatures colder then -13*F as long as they are protected from the wind. Hmm the more I research Darlingtonia the more tough and interesting they seem. Once it gets warm I might have to do an experiment involving sacrificing some Cobra's from Lowes. I think I am gonna plant a bunch in two of my experimental bog gardens. One I am going to heavily mulch each year and the other one I will leave to the elements to see the effect of a severe winter has on exposed plants as opposed to mulched over plants. However I think so far I have proven that Darlingtonia should be able to survive at least an Ohio winter with mulching. One day I plan on doing this experiment with crop raised from seed to see how they do however that isn't for a long time or at least untill I get a new permanent house. Next on my list VFTs... oh wait Schloaty already proved they can survive -35*F temps with minor mulching... ok then... onto S. Leucophylla it is then! maybe even P. Primuliflora as they seem to die like crazy when I pamper them. Wonder how they will survive when I throw them against the elements...

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