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Thread: Just how much can a plant take?

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    Ok over winter when I can't see my plants I have decided I want to build another Bog garden. However I keep having visions of Darlingtonia growing along a stream. I live in Ohio as everyone knows and our climate is vastly different from Oregon. The record low of Florence Oregon is 9* F while here in New Carlisle the record low is -25* F. That's a difference of 34*F. Now I am basing this off of record lows simply because those are the worst of the worst and as my dad always said plan for the worst. Now it is my understanding that plants have to be able to be extremely adaptable. It would be advantageous for a zone 7/8 plant to survive in zone 5/6 and we have all heard stories of it happening such as D. Capensis and Highland Neps surviving freezes. So here is my question what do you think the lowest temperature a carnivorous plant can survive for a long time. Would it be possible for a Darlingtonia to survive a month with -5* F out in the wild? I mean I understand it is supposed suicide for a plant like this to endure these temperatures for extended times unmulched but to use the famous quote "Plants don't read books". I mean just because a Cobra hasn't endured extremely low temps for long times doesn't mean it isn't capable of. What about genetic variability. If I got a large group of genetically diverse plants and let them endure an Ohio winter and by chance some survived to breeding age would the offspring of these cold tempered plants be cold hardy? What if someone were to set up a control population of plants and let them go for like 10-15 years? Would the plants have genetically adapted to the Ohio environment to be considered a different cultivar/subspecies since they are now surviving in aplce regular Darlingtonia's don't? Now for this example I am using Dar's because that is what's important to my situation but I think it would be useful to know the extreme's that any plant can survive, even if it means extensive testing is needed. Am I being clear enough?

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    I am from Nebraska. No, it can not survive a lot of things. It will not survive a cold winter out side. You could just take the pot of plants out side in the good months. Sink the pots into the ground if you want the look of natural growth.


    34 degrees is a massive temp difference. It is not an only.
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (Copper @ Dec. 22 2004,10:01)]I am from Nebraska. No, it can not survive a lot of things. It will not survive a cold winter out side. You could just take the pot of plants out side in the good months. Sink the pots into the ground if you want the look of natural growth.


    34 degrees is a massive temp difference. It is not an only.
    I think you misunderstood what I am saying. I know They will die if exposed to severe cold for long periods of time. I just wondering if it were possible for a select few plants. Like in another thread a guy mentioned his venus flytraps surviving -30* F and they are from the Carolinas. I mean I don't care if you have them mulched under 2 ft of pine needles that is still cold. It's like this. You know how I said the lowest recorded temperature is 9*F in Florence Oregon? Well that's the lowest temperature so far. Who's to say they couldn't get a severe winter where the temperature drops down to -5* F? It's entirely possible for the temperatures in Oregon to drop down that low. It's highly unlikely but possible and there would be plants that survive unmulched conditions. Now Darlingtonia's was only an example. I want this applied to any plant.I think plants are more durable then we give them credit for. I believe just because a plant is from zone 8 doesn't mean it can't survive in a zone 7 or zone 6 with extremely little care.

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    You can also mulch your bog garden for the winter. We has a REALLY cold winter last year....Record lows left and right (try minus 35 with no heat for a night...not fun). However, my experiment plants lived! I had VFT's, a sar and some d. rotundifolia (no surprise they lived). I had them mulched under 3" of reptile cedar bedding...not recommended, but these were experimental plants, so I figured what the heck.

    The other worry would be the extreme highs you guys have in the summer...much hotter that Oregon generally gets in Darlingtonia habitat. How are you going to do the cool water on the roots.
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (schloaty @ Dec. 22 2004,10:42)]You can also mulch your bog garden for the winter. We has a REALLY cold winter last year....Record lows left and right (try minus 35 with no heat for a night...not fun). However, my experiment plants lived! I had VFT's, a sar and some d. rotundifolia (no surprise they lived). I had them mulched under 3" of reptile cedar bedding...not recommended, but these were experimental plants, so I figured what the heck.

    The other worry would be the extreme highs you guys have in the summer...much hotter that Oregon generally gets in Darlingtonia habitat. How are you going to do the cool water on the roots.
    Well the highs in Ohio aren't really a problem. besides the minibog I see in my head is mostly a recirculating stream. From what I hear, water movement is mroe important then water temperature.Besides last summer when the highs were in the high 90s my Darlingtonia's did great.

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    I do think that some plants could survive these conditions. S. purpurea for example. I've heard that they can survive dips below -30 for quite a while and return unharmed in the winter. I think they live way up in Canada, or at least some forms do, not to say they don't live elsewhere.

    I have also heard stories of some Ultricaria living in lakes that are frozen solid for MOST of the year.

    I do think that some plants would be able to take these conditions, i do believe that darlingtonias can survive these conditions, once it freezes, why does it care if it gets colder?
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    I think you could possibly have some plants survive and become adapted to the cold. I know this has happened with vfts as there is a small wild population growing in the upper peninsula of Michigan, which i know for a fact has much colder winters than the Carolinas will ever see. Granted most of the plants would likely die but after time you might have a couple that could survive. Like you said though the most gentically diverse group is gonna have the best chance
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    S. purpurea is not Darlintonia. that said you would be surprised how well some cobras can survive "less than ideal" conditions. mine is sitting in WARM water in PURE peat in 70-80 degrees EVERY day and is quite happy. there is no reason not to experiment. especially with a TC grown Darlintonia. they arent rare so if yah loose it its not THAT big of a deal. go ahead and try it.
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