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Thread: I need photos of growth points

  1. #9

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    blender method? this is the first i hear about it, could someone ellaborate?
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  2. #10

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    blender?! are you thinking of the way they propagate moss? if so... no! lol.
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  3. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (LauraZ5 @ June 08 2005,6:37)]Thank you very much. That's a big help. I don't have any plants that are large enough to be able to photograph growth points yet and I really need the close up photos.

    Now, you can take these growth points and kids could put them in a blender and after they are pulverized, the kids could spread the mixture out on top of sphagnum and the blender mix of growth points would grow a lot of new Sarracenia right? The kids would just have to be careful to get the entire growth point in the blender correct?

    Would the blender method of propagation work on Drosera and Dionaea too?
    Hi Laura,
    Thanks for the propagation tip! I just put all of my sarrs, one by one, in a blender. It took some doing, and I had to clean it thoroughly after each plant, but man are we gonna have lots of plants!

    Now, I'm no fool, so I did save one growing point on each plant. Thanks for offering that suggestion when I PMd you. I knew that there was a leaf method of propagation, so this makes sense to me. It seems like a crude method of tissue culture.
    Joe

    P.S. I am NOT suggesting anyone else try this! It is experimental at this time. Do NOT sacrifice your own plants.
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  4. #12
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    Oh my lord NO do not put your plants blender!! To start new plants you just cut the growth points in half or quarters depending on the size and plant them.
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  5. #13

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    this may sound stupid, but are you serious?
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  6. #14
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    here is a link on propagation of sars
    link

    Division
    Division of plants is the easiest and most successful method of your increasing stock. This is best achieved during the Spring when new growth is just beginning to appear.

    A well established Sarracenia will be seen to have several plants arising from the original rhizome, removing the plant from the pot will reveal most of these will have their own root systems. These individual plants should be removed from the parent plant using a sharp knife (preferably a scalpel), making sure to keep as many roots as possible with the new plant. These should then be repotted in in the usual compost.

    Any plant removed without an efficient rooting system will take considerably longer to establish (if at all) than a comparable one with a good root system. Usually it is better to leave the plant attached to the rhizome for a further year, at least this way success is almost certainly guaranteed when the plant is removed.

    Rhizome Cuttings
    An alternative to dividing the plant ensuring each individual plant has its own root system is to simply divide the rhizome into segments. Here again however ensure each segment has its own root system. The cuts should be made with a very sharp knife, any dead or diseased sections of the rhizome should be removed and discarded at this time, the healthy sections being potted up into the standard Sarracenia compost.

    As with dividing the plants this is best done when growth is just starting to appear in the Spring, the rhizome sections should just be laid within the compost and the roots firmly anchored. The compost should not be allowed to dry out, and ensure the plant has adequate light and ventilation to prevent any disease from taking hold where the rhizome has been cut.

    New buds may take some time to appear, so be patient if this method is used to increase your stock.
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  7. #15
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    PLEASE, no one try this. Attempting this stunt with your plants would be like trying to imitate the MTV show with the stupid guys trying really stupid things. I'll let you all know how this turns out.
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  8. #16
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    Hehe, while the blender technique may be sound based on the fact that plant cells exhibit totipotency (-most- every cell has the potential to form a new plant) I don't think this would work out so hot. For starters, the blender would probably do excessive damage to the cells, and as a broken up cell does us no good this wouldn't be the most effective means. Furthermore, I'd say you'd probably want bigger chunks anyway. Lastly, this process would be most viable if you're going the T/C route, if you just lay the chunks down on the soil, I'm not quite sure what your results will be, but the bigger the pieces the higher the sucess I imagine. All in all, this would be most effective if used along with T/C instead of simply laying doing the chunks. For use without T/C I'd say just keep the divisions of the growth point conservative.

    ---> I realize it may be a bit late since this thread originated quite a while ago, but I'll take some pics if needed... Heck, I'll probably do it just to avoid studying for Spanish finals. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_n_32.gif[/img]
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