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Thread: Re-discovery by nature conservancy team

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    According to NPR yesterday and our new channel today a team for the Nature Conservancy re-discovered this bird that was though to be extint for about half a century. This happened in Arkansas and there have been seven sightings. The find is supposed to be in this week's edition of Nature (If I remember right). This is absolutly amazing.

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    Whats it to ya? Finch's Avatar
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    i find it interesting that no one else seems to care. comeon people lets see some enthusiasm
    that makes no logic

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    Whats it to ya? Finch's Avatar
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    oh
    that makes no logic

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    That is definatly good news unless they are mistakely thinking the it is a Ivory instead of a Pileated. However, without the major efforts that have gone into saving the California Condor, this species still has little chance of surviving. If it has thaught to be extinct for such a long time period the gene pool must be very small. Hopefully some action is taken to photograph thaught findings and then further action is taken to build the population if it is found to be a true Ivory(s).
    \"Anyway, no drug, not even alcohol, causes the fundamental ills of society. If we're looking for the source of our troubles, we shouldn't test people for drugs, we should test them for stupidity, ignorance, greed and love of power.\"
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    Gawd,

    I think these people probably know the difference between a pileated and ivory billed...the field markings are very different!
    \"People place their hand on the Bible and swear to uphold the Constitution; they don't put their hand on the Constitution and swear to uphold the Bible,\" Jamie Raskin, to Senator Nancy Jacobs.

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    Whats it to ya? Finch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]species still has little chance of surviving
    NONSENCE! There breeding and sucessfuly raising chicks in the wild totaly without human assistance (but heavy monitering and people ready to act if they see problems, and just sutch a case has happened) - captve bread birds breeding in the wild. Many safeguards and supplementary feeding incase food supplies fail for the relesed population in Arizona, the most sucessful this far

    See Chatham Islands black robin HERE
    that makes no logic

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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (Finch @ April 28 2005,9:44)]
    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]species still has little chance of surviving
    NONSENCE! There breeding and sucessfuly raising chicks in the wild totaly without human assistance (but heavy monitering and people ready to act if they see problems, and just sutch a case has happened) - captve bread birds breeding in the wild. Many safeguards and supplementary feeding incase food supplies fail for the relesed population in Arizona, the most sucessful this far

    See Chatham Islands black robin HERE
    That is a very unique example, most species who's gene pool has deminished to that low of a level have little hope of surviving without human intervention. Actually at that extreme low of a level even with human help there is little to no chance of survival. Inbreeding brings out recessive traits, most species cannot survive such conditions.

    And yes field marking are a good Identification method, tho many variations can occur in a species. I had slate colored dark eyed juncos here that had white stripes on their wings and their loreals(sp?) where also white. A very big difference from the standard Junco found here. Wouldn't it also be possible for the single spotted bird to have had a unique color pattern? Two white spots on the body wouldn't be to far fetch for a Pileated.

    Don't take me the wrong way tho, I do hope the it is the Ivories. It would be great to have a species rediscovered. And I hope that the effort that has gone into saving the condor goes into saving them as well.
    \"Anyway, no drug, not even alcohol, causes the fundamental ills of society. If we're looking for the source of our troubles, we shouldn't test people for drugs, we should test them for stupidity, ignorance, greed and love of power.\"
    --P. J. O'Rourke
    GL

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    Whats it to ya? Finch's Avatar
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    your logic, while mostly correct, is not only pessamistic but its also a bit too pessamistic and i will show you several examples in wich species have recovered from extreme lows without human help or continual intervention.

    The Laysan duck has stood several times on the edge of extinction in tha hands of men but without being managed in any way (manegment started in 1953) its survival story is amazing. "species hovered on the brink of extinction between 1905 and 1930 when the population dropped to seven individuals and a single female. This decrease was largely due to a combination of hunting by guano mine workers and plume hunters followed by the introduction of European rabbits, which nearly wiped out all of Laysan Island's vegetation. As a result of this radical habitat degradation, three of the island's four endemic land birds went extinct. Lack of vegetative cover permitted erosion and blowing sand partially filled in the lake. The rabbits all subsequently starved to death, at which point the island began to revegetate" The species bounced back from this low to a population of around 400 Without human help in any way. Recently the population has begun to sag again but there is evedence that the population fluctuates quite naturaly.

    The Hihi (Stitchbird) became extinct on the main island of new zealand but some lingerd on at Little Barrier Island and has since flourished there, without human help, altough measures have been taken to improve nesting sucess by eradicating some introduced predators. despite our attempts, no other populations (those others are human reintroductions) to other islands are self-sustaining.


    Many plant species resued by humans no longer need active manegment.



    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]level have little hope of surviving without human intervention

    The Chatham Islands black robin has self-sustaining populations on several islands and many no longer are managed, altough we are still reintroducing them to more islands and monitering the poulation. After the population has built up to a certain level we dont need to intervene any more unless we make a big boo-boo like introducing predators that shouldnt be there-

    like at guam, its forests are totaly silent from bird song because we introduced the brown treesnake.
    that makes no logic

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