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Thread: White turks cap

  1. #9

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    Hope you are one of those people who can laugh at himself. I just had a friend look at this photo and she said it's a Malvaceae. Whom ever gave you the common name as being Turk's Cap for this sort of screwed up. One of the common names for this plant is Turk's Turban however. I can see how one could have easily interchanged the Cap and Turban and I'm sure the two common names are in print out there associated with this particular plant on the www to muddy the waters even further.

  2. #10

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    I know they are related to hybiscus (sp?). They are for sale in stores here. They back during winter and I am fairly sure some are from the bahamas (sp?). It's kind of hard to pick them being bushes and all. I have a read one and I cannot get it to produce seed do to the fact that it gets too cold and I beleve they are sterile. No naturalized though. I doubt the neighbors would like me going to their yard and digging up these "invasive" plants.

  3. #11

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    Hey Tre, I thought you were seeing them driving down the road, assumption being ditches not in people's yards. Of course no one should go digging in somebody else's yard. You need to stop and ask for a cutting of the plant if you want one. The few times I have seen plants growing on private property that I wanted seed of or a cutting, I stopped and asked. The people were ever so gracious and I recall one man who actually sat and bagged seed for me so that I could share it with friends. Penstemon, I got Smooth Penstemon that had been growing as a remnant along the side of his house that he never mowed. I told him what it was and he was very happy. Next year I brought him some seedlings I had grown from his seed. He was thrilled. Now he has my phone number and even his wife called me to come and look at something. Turns out it was garlic mustard but they still called. I have met some of the nicest people the few times I have stopped.

    Hibiscus is a member of the Malvaceous Family.

    I googled this and found that your plant, if it looks similar to the image you linked to only in white, might be a hybrid of the native species and the introduced species- Malvaviscus arboreus penduliflorus Alba
    I found it here-
    http://toptropicals.com/cgi-bin....us_alba
    There is a native version that is being referred to as Turk's Cap Mallow that is white but the leaves are somewhat different.

    I am not all that familiar with plants that are indigenous or that have naturalized at the expense of native flora and fauna in Forida. You may need to get a hold of a native plant society down by you and ask for help on the ID but take a photo with your own camera if at all possible so that the leaf and flower to the exact plant you want identified will be able to be seen by people trying to help you. So many look so much alike it isn't even funny. Incredibly frustrating though.

    They are definitely not sterile. Many hybrids have been released that were thought to be sterile that definitely weren't. Classic example is the Bradford Pear. Once they began introducing more Caleryana cultivars to the market, they began hybridizing wildly. The offspring were anything but sterile.

    Best wishes to you.

  4. #12

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    Thanks Laura. I am not very good at IDing garden plants scientifically yet. FYI that is the plant.

  5. #13

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    Well, that makes two of us. I had "experts" ID a plant for me over here that was allegedly an introduced species that was highly invasive. I was all set to start ripping it out based on all the photos I found on the web that appeared to a be a dead match until it began to unfurl itself. The way it did so was inconsistent with the exotic species. Lord knows I did enough digging in herbarium records to gather that data. Turns out I may actually have the native species here at my home as a remnant. The native species is not even being found locally and hasn't for decades. aprilh over here at Terra spotted it and commented and I took a look at the photos for the plant she suggested it was and what can I say... looked like the exact same plant. Most are not so difficult as this and Thank God or I would be ripping my hair out and throwing in my shovel!

    By the way, aprilh was the one who I had look at your photo when she stopped in after shopping at a native plant sale earlier today. Sheeeeeeeeee's goooooooooooood! Considerably better than me!

  6. #14

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    Yeah I go to native plant sales to find Cps and orchids (fro my friend if he's there) I don't really bother with the native plants. I experiment to find what works well in flowering and butterfly food plants. The turks cap is good for hummingbirds so thats why I wanted another. I have a very nice Bamboo orchid gowing outside that survived winter that I hope will flower this year enough to attract some other interesting butterflies.

  7. #15

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    Here's one list-
    http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/UW062
    Scroll down toward the bottom to get to shrubs which is probably what you're more interested in.

    This list is used by many down in your neck of the woods. It does list Fraxinus though. Fraxinus is very beneficial to wildlife but sadly I suspect it will be wiped off the continent in the very near future. Containment of the emerald ash borer has been for all practical purposes... unsuccessful. Ash trees are going cheap these days as nurseries try to unload them on the public. Many firesales out there and the public is planting them like mad. The EAB (Agrilus planipennis) will ultimately do more damage to all Ash than what DED did to American Elms and what Chestnut Blight did to the American Chestnut tree. At this point, I couldn't in good conscience tell anyone to pay good money to plant any Ash. The EAB is non descriminating in that it doesn't just attack stressed Ash, it goes after them all. The EAB was introduced to us from- ASIA. The state of Michigan is claiming victory against the borer however if they were so "victorious", I am having difficulty understanding why the EAB hit Illinois 3 years earlier than its anticipated arrival and it most certainly is now documented as being here. If you are interested in conservation issues, check this out-
    http://www.indiana-arborist.org/pdf....SH'

    Here are a few other sites for plants for your hummingbirds and butterflies-
    http://www.backyardbrevard.com/plants2.html
    Milkweed (Asclepias tuberosa), which is recommended at the above site, is a butterfly magnet!
    http://www.fnps.org/pages/links/plant_links.php
    Some interesting links here
    http://www.biophilia.net/
    Absolutely one of the best sites on the web and if you contact her looking for help in attracting hummers and butterflies, she will help you.

    I am glad you are trying to help out the hummingbirds and the butterflies. Don't forget a few plants to help the moths, they're struggling too.

  8. #16

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    Ok, Laura, since I saved your rare Orchid from the spade, may I have one of them? [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_m_32.gif[/img] Just kidding, as I don't have the correct habitat for it here. Leave the little darlings where they are! Protect them from Bambi.

    Tre, native plants will attract lots of butterflies, but for different reasons. In order to have lots of butterflies, you have to have larvae..and if you provide food for their larvae, you will have lots of butterflies! That is where native plants come in. Native plants host the larvae of lots of butterflies. After all, they have evolved together over time immemorial.

    For instance..a cool vine called Dutchman's Pipe. Very showy, with unusual blooms. A native plant. It is the larval food for the Pipevine Swallowtail butterfly, which, in this area, is a threatened species.

    Aprilh
    \"People place their hand on the Bible and swear to uphold the Constitution; they don't put their hand on the Constitution and swear to uphold the Bible,\" Jamie Raskin, to Senator Nancy Jacobs.

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