User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 17 to 24 of 24

Thread: White turks cap

  1. #17

    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    1,379
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    April, that's Carol's link up above. Biophilia. And yes, you can take what ever thou little heart desireth.

    Here's a native stand of May Apples (Podophyllum peltatum).

    This is over to the right of the driveway. The May Apples you saw in the backyard to the right in the woods were planted there by me a few years ago. One is a remnant stand and the other stand was created by moi! Those will work for you if you want some.

  2. #18

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Jacksonville, Florida
    Posts
    2,154
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Yes I know Carol (the owner of biophila). Yeah I would have more milkweed but all the monarch caterpillers ate mine (including the sxeedlings) so I am not sure nay got to adult hood. I have two more plants now so I have 7 altogether. They are so expensive though. IF I have caterpillers of the white gulf frittery I can trade Carol next time I see her (I mean trade fro plants).

  3. #19

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Jacksonville, Florida
    Posts
    2,154
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    How about I list all the native stuff I have being that it may be native or not:
    Passiflora
    Dutchman's pipe/Pelican Flower (few flowers hopefully more this year)
    Milkweed (A. tuberosa in yellow and orange)
    Red Turks cap (both the lilly and the bush)
    Orange Tree (good food source for giant swallowtails)
    Lantana (for flowers, not actually native and banned from import)
    Worm-wood (not the tree some other low varigated anenimaie (sp?) lokkng leaves)
    Ice palnt (for flowers)
    Many Iris (dito)
    Mexican Petunia (dito)
    Coreopsis (need I say more)
    Orchid tree (bush form w/white flowers)
    Wildflowers everywhere.
    Parsely (sp?)

  4. #20

    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    1,379
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    You don't need to trade for milkweed, germinate it on your own. It does require cold stratification of about 60 days which you can easily do. Just wrap them in a damp paper towel, toss them in a ziplock baggie, and toss them in your veggie drawer of your refrigerator for 2 months. I do it differently but then I'm in a different area. Here's where you can get some kick milkweed seed- http://www.milkweedfarm.com/

    Tre, I couldn't begin to have the time to go through your list based on common names. There's a few things sticking out at me but you really need to use their binomials.

    Let's take the Iris for example. There are many well behaved exotic introduced iris out there. There are many native iris out there too and all of them are well behaved. Most exotic introduced iris, like hosta, are pretty well behaved. I happen to like iris. I have a few thousand native iris here. Tee he, I also have several hundred non native iris here and non of them are invasive. There is one introduced iris that seems to be extremely popular which is doing a considerable amount of damage, it is the Yellow Flag Iris (Iris pseudacorus). It has naturalized in many swampy moist areas. This is not good. This is where many of our native carnivorous plants like to put down their roots and colonize. Now the Blue Flag Iris (Iris versicolor) is a native and it is not aggressive at all and generally coexists quite nicely. Which iris of the thousand out there do you have? If it's a native, I'd probably be able to recognize it from a photo. If it isn't native, your guess is as good as mine. Regarding the Mexican petunia- I don't need to say much there ;)

    Is there a local native plant or wildlife group you could join in your area? I think you are a prime candidate based on your interests.

    You really gotta use binomials Tre. Keep your plant tags when you buy plants. Photograph the area where you plant. Create your own stakes and write the binomial on them. That's what I do. After a while, you will become more familiar with your own plants. The use of common names can be a logistical nightmare.

  5. #21

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Jacksonville, Florida
    Posts
    2,154
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Well I did got soem white flowreed cuttings. Thanks for that website Laura. See the problem is I buy most of my plants from shows across the country (Which the NECPS society members can testify to if they looked in my car) and most don't come with the "real" names the people just say them. Same for the orchids I buy. So I never really get (or rarly get) the actual names. Yes the common names are annoying. The problem with the garden/native/orchid clubs/socities near me is they are all for Stay-at-home-parents adn retirees b/c they meet at anywhere from 2-4 pm and last for an hour and I cann't really leave to go there. Well I could jon the Orchid or Iris society of JAckonville but both places had many members smoking cigars and cigarettes which I hapen to be alergic too and they smell horrible + I don't want to die of lung cancer. I actually only control the side of the house's garden and yes some plants (mexican petunias for example) are semi-invasive but they would have a hard time establishing int he woods due to a horrible eco-system (suppresson of fire means almost 2 feet of pine needles and no new trees or other plants b/c no light or soil). I eally only use them for errosion control which prevents "the hill" from sliding down into the house.
    Do you have a suggestion for a good wild-plant guide for under $30 that will ID things as native or not? Mine must be horrible since they list things like lantana camillaris and Iris pseudacorus as native along with crown vetch and countless other ones.

  6. #22

    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    1,379
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hmmm, no such thing as semi-invasive. That's sort of like being semi-pregnant.

    Regarding Mexican Petunias, you probably have Ruellia brittoniana but Strobilanthes atropurpureus is a possibility. Both are native to Mexico. Both can reproduce when plant parts touch the ground which root and grow eventually producing large colonies of plants. They also spread by rhizomes. The next issue is the seed. Mexican Petunias flower in spring, summer, and fall down in your neck of the woods. That means they are producing seed for about 9 months out of the year under ideal conditions. Given what prolific seeders they are and given there is documentation out there that the seed from a single plant is capable of literally traveling miles... can you be so sure it will land in an inhospitable environment? Basically, these plants reproduce both vegetatively and sexually. That can be a big problem. Deadheading them can reduce the spread but it is often difficult to keep up with that and then there are the rhizomes with which to contend.

    There is a reason why Mexican Petunia is listed as a Category I invasive species by the Florida Exotic Pest Plant Council. It is "altering native plant communities by displacing native species, changing community structures or ecological functions, or hybridizing with natives". This warning applies to all parts of the state of Florida (and other areas with similar mild climates). Where hardy, the Mexican petunia excels at invading wetlands.

    Here's a link from your own state so you can read up on what you have planted in your yard-
    http://www.bonus.com/contour....ri.html
    Tre, that's a highly invasive species and a prescribed burn would be ineffective as it isn't going to be able to control them. Well, it may help a tad on your property.

    I think you might want to consider joining a local native plant society. I believe you will find the vast majority meet in the evening to accommodate those who work. There is a link at this site to find a local chapter-
    http://www.fnps.org/

    Regarding using Mexican Petunias for erosion control, who told you this? Did you read it on line somewhere? Possibly in a book or in a pamphlet from a nursery selling Mexican Petunias? There are much better plants for watershed management and erosion control. The Mexican Petunia isn't one of them as to the best of my knowledge it is rather ineffective/counter productive for a multitude of reasons. Try contacting these people for a list of species that will really work for you-
    http://www.fnps.org/pages/plants/invasives.php
    Also, Florida has established a farmers' native seed co-op called the Florida Wildflower Cooperative. You might want to contact them for seed. You can read a little bit about it here-
    http://stormwatercenter.com/ecm_0411_trends.html

    Forget purchasing a book for right now. You can save your $30 and start right here-
    http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/EP011#TABLE_1
    That's a decent wild plant guide and you can look up images of the species your are interested in right on the Internet.
    In order to properly ID your plants, you need to have good photos. There are people at those native plant societies who can spot a non native a mile away. Just remember that the vast majority of non natives are very well behaved (something some native plant lovers donít like to admit) so don't go ripping anything out of your yard until you know what you have. Non native plant people can be a little bit overzealous. Anyway, once you find out the Latin name to your plant, type it in to your browser and add the word invasive. Make sure your spelling is correct. You should be able to find the answer to your questions real quick.

    Best wishes to you.

  7. #23

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Jacksonville, Florida
    Posts
    2,154
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Okay. Thanks. Did not know it was Class 1...Hmm that class keeps seeming to have left stuff out.
    Well I used mexican petunias (Ruellia) to control "the hill" becausezero plants were growing on it except chickweed (another non-native taht I have almost eradicated). Chickweed grows from a rhizome and dies back in winter so "the hill" was gradually moving closer to teh house. It has all but stopped now.

  8. #24

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Evanston, IL
    Posts
    836
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The Peterson Field Guide for "Wildflowers" East of the Rockies is a good starting point, and so is an organisation called the Wild Ones..www.forwild.org
    So is the Ladybird Johnson Wildflower Center...http://www.wildflower.org/

    Native plants put down roots anywhere from 5 to 30 feet deep, and are great at stabilising hillsides. April.
    \"People place their hand on the Bible and swear to uphold the Constitution; they don't put their hand on the Constitution and swear to uphold the Bible,\" Jamie Raskin, to Senator Nancy Jacobs.

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •