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Thread: Is there such thing as too much sunlight

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    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    For the third time this week I have heard it mentioned that that someone's VFT or sundew will either be or has been scorched by too much sunlight.

    Now my first response to that is maybe they have purchased a plant from a garden center that has been neglected and abused. And of course a radical change to outside will probably put a weak plant in shock. But is it possible for a CP to have too much light, other than a D. adelae or P. primuliflora - especially a VFT or a typical sundew?

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    I'm sure there is. Just like they need their dormancy period, they need their night.
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    Far too old to grow up now. Kate's Avatar
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    I think more probably it is not much light in general as it is too intense. Speaking from experience a mere 2 hours of afternoon mid August sun in southern Florida will cook even the most well adapted VFT to crispy little plant flakes. (It did I saw it.. I kicked myself for weeks.. occasionally still have pangs of guilt.) Where as you go farther north and a few hours of afternoon sun may only just cause a little drying of the leaf tips if the plant isn't used to it.

    Someone who actually understands all the forumulas and light "tempuratures" (all that math type stuff! *shudder*) could explain it better.
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    It's been one of dem days BigCarnivourKid's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]For the third time this week I have heard it mentioned that that someone's VFT or sundew will either be or has been scorched by too much sunlight.
    I find it hard to accept that it was light alone that 'crisped' the plants. I have to wonder if the plants were acclimated to the direct light gradually? Was it in a tray with adequate water or not? What were the temps and humidity that day? Was it windy or calm? The answer to my first question would tell me whether or not the plant had had time to toughen up the leaves to take the outdoor conditions for more than a short period of time. The rest of the questions would give me an idea of how fast water would evaporate from the leaves and whether it had a ready source of water to replace what was lost through transpiration and evaporation. Hot dry weather with even a light breeze can rob a plant of water faster than the roots can take it up. In my experience, plants that get crisped were the ones I didn't give enough time to get used to the outdoors. Keep in mind that while I live in the moutains of Colorado at about 7,950 feet (2423 meters). And while the temps seldom get above 95f for more than a couple weeks during the summer, the thinner air allows more UV to reach the ground. Any plant that hasn't had time to toughen up gets fried quick.

    Edit: As a suggestion: If the plants are outside in hot weather, perhaps placing their pots in a container that would allow water levels to be kept just below or even slightly above the soil surface. This would help keep the plant cooled by evaporation of the water around it and perhaps make it easier for the roots to draw up water.
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    Here in Michigan, I give them full direct sunlight all day with no problem at all. I don't think they can have too much natural sunlight, as long as they are adapted to the sun they should be fine. Although, some of the best vft specimens I've seen are grown in less sunlight.
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    SirKristoff is a poopiehead Ozzy's Avatar
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    I guess it would depend on where you're at. Like it was said before in southern Florida, direct sun all day may not be a good idea. In NC most cp sites get full sun almost all day, but they grow in grass. The grass offers a lot of shade. Most of the time the traps will totally be under the grass. So the amount of light depends on where you live. If I remember right, you're in PA. I would think that if your flytraps were in direct sun all day, there would be no ill effects.

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    Too much of anything is never good. Every organism has to rest, plant or animal. How'd you like it if given work 24/7?

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    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (Maehem @ May 07 2005,8:50)]I think more probably it is not much light in general as it is too intense. Speaking from experience a mere 2 hours of afternoon mid August sun in southern Florida will cook even the most well adapted VFT to crispy little plant flakes. (It did I saw it.. I kicked myself for weeks.. occasionally still have pangs of guilt.) Where as you go farther north and a few hours of afternoon sun may only just cause a little drying of the leaf tips if the plant isn't used to it.

    Someone who actually understands all the forumulas and light "tempuratures" (all that math type stuff! *shudder*) could explain it better.
    Kate, math is our friend!

    Seriously, putting the responses together, it would appear that Southern light, if not shaded somewhat, is too much. In contrast, in higher lattitudes, there really isn't an issue of too much light.

    Also, poor acclimation, a different cause, produces the same effects.

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