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Thread: Non-cps that are non-invasive

  1. #1

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    1) hillside with sun from 10-12 noon (starting) and ending at 6-8 (winter to spring)
    2) does not die in frost n(non-decidous)
    3) lives in zone 9 (and flowers)
    4) flowers a lot
    5) will stand drought
    6) is managable (does not seed prolificlly)

    So far I have succeeded in 0 plants fitting this description (cept for longleaf pine but that does nto really flower)
    But I have some that meet some requirements:
    Coreopsis
    Passiflora
    lantana (naturallized pink & cultivated red flowered varities only)

    Any suggestions for bush or tree like things?

  2. #2
    herenorthere's Avatar
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    By flowering a lot do you mean something that blooms a lot at once or that has a long bloom period? Most non-tropical trees and bushes have distinct bloom seasons.

    If you want lots of flowers through a long season, you might consider a "wildflower" seed mix, especially if you can burn that hillside at least every couple years. Many seed profusely and can be invasive, but that's considered more acceptable if they're native species. Many "wildflower" mixes include species from across the globe, so do some research and find a more local one. The Florida Extension probably can steer you to more information.
    Bruce in CT

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  3. #3

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    A lot of flowers at once or a long bloom period. I mulched the hill so no seed (unfortunatly). This is because non-native invasives (or native invasives) including: topedo grass, chickweed, dollarweed, etc. (about 15 species in all) took over. Oh an I doubt my community would let me do a burn (some idiot would definatly call the fire department) (actually someone was BBQing and there was a lot of smoke and this happened, firemen were p*****).

  4. #4
    SirKristoff is a poopiehead Ozzy's Avatar
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    What about an azalea?

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    Ozzy,

    Azaleas are woodland plants for the most part, and probably wouldn't do too well on a sunny hillside. They prefer moist, shade/dappled shade, slightly acidic conditions.

    Lantana are invasive, and are quite a problem in several states. Here is a site to check for the nativity and invasiveness of plants..

    http://plants.usda.gov/

    Your best bet would be to steer WAY clear of the "wildflower" garden in a can type of things. Lots of invasives are usually included, stuff like dame's rocket. DH planted a meadow in a can about 10 years ago, and the only thing that survives to this day is Echinacea Purpurea, and Dame's Rocket(which I'm still trying to get rid of.) Meadow in a can looks very nice the first year, because 99% of the seeds therein are annuals. They are not going to come back unless they re-seed. So, in year 2, you will have a bunch of weeds where your pretty meadow was.

    Here are some sources that would have seed mixes specifically for your area:

    www.prairiemoon.com
    www.prairienursery.com
    www.newfs.org

    You don't have to burn your hillside, a good mowing will do fine. the Prairie Moon and Prairie Nursery catalogues have excellent directions on how to start your planting. In fact, when you start your planting, burning is not recommended for the first 2 or 3 years. And remember..you can't have a meadow without grasses, the seed mixes from the above vendors include native grasses that will help to literally support the forbs. The native stuff will help hold your hillside in place, and give you 3 seasons of blooms. Aprilh
    \"People place their hand on the Bible and swear to uphold the Constitution; they don't put their hand on the Constitution and swear to uphold the Bible,\" Jamie Raskin, to Senator Nancy Jacobs.

  6. #6

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    Hi,
    Passionflowers are usually not hardy, I only know of two species that are, Passiflora caerulea and Passiflora incarnata
    Even these would have trouble surving long, cold winters where temperatures plummet well below freezing very regualy
    Carnivorous plants growlist:http://www.**********.com/cgi-bin....t=17597
    Onda je sultan pao mrtav do kostura

  7. #7

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    Ohh yeah Starman I am in Jacksonville, Fl (zone 9 (top)) so the passiflora come back everyyear from the roots b/c the ground does not freeze.

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