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Thread: Cherry seeds

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    Loves VFT's! Trapper7's Avatar
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    I bought some organic cherries today and saved the seeds cause I want to plant them hoping they will turn into Cherry trees.Will that happen?Do I have to soak the seeds first?How would I go about doing this?*Niki*
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    Whats it to ya? Finch's Avatar
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    plant them in the fall (or stratification) where you would like them to grow (cherry trees hate being transplanted). Fruit quality will likely vary considerably by tree when your planted trees fruit, so a large amount of trees will increse the chance that atleast a few will have good fruit.

    Cherries belong to one of our most disease and insect-prone families, and many frusterate orchardists. Wach out for black knot disease and control it when it first appeirs. Tent caterpillers can defiliate entier orchards. Trees weakened ny these or several other difoliaters and fungas diseases are tergets for borers

    Wild (and perhaps cultivated domestic too) cherry trees can be allelopithic to some other garden plants.They are Sensetive to soil disturbance bark injury, and rain down ceaseless twig litter.
    that makes no logic

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    Thanks for the info Finch but I didn't understand more than half of what you said,lol.Ok so I should plant in the fall(or stratification)what do you mean by or stratification?Thanks again [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_m_32.gif[/img] ~Niki~ [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/cool.gif[/img]
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    Niki,

    You should know that if you are hoping for the same kind of cherry you obtained the seed from...that you may of may not meet with success. Most fruit trees these days are grafted. A root stock is taken from a very root-hardy and strong growing member of the same family...in this case the Rosaceae, or rose family. The upper part that is grafted into the root stock is called the scion, or scion wood. All that said, you may get the cherry seed to grow, but who knows if you will ever get it top bear good fruit. You should also know that fruit trees are not easy to grow organically, especially all the members of the rose family (apples, pears, cherries, etc) because as previously stated, they are hosts to a multitude of pests and diseases. It can be done - and it certainly makes one appreciate organically grow produce a lot more.

    Stratification is a process used to coax a plant to break dormancy and it takes many forms. Cold treatment is one and is also used for stratification of many CP seeds. With some plants it is more involved, i.e. cold, then warm, then cold again. I suggest if you really want to try to grow cherries that you contact your local cooperative extension - they are a wonderful source of agricultural and horticultural information.

    This is probably way more information that you were looking for, but I hope it helps.

    John

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    Loves VFT's! Trapper7's Avatar
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    Thanks John [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/biggrin.gif[/img] ~Niki~
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    Cherries are very sensitive to climate, especially to water, and the commercial varieties generally only do well in the climate where they're grown. Sweet cherries are extra bad about it.

    Depending on where you are in Canada, you might want to look for someone with an Evans (also known as Bali) cherry. The variety originated in a prairie province and it's a durable one. I've heard of people growing Evans all the way down into the southeastern US, so the variety tolerates all kinds of trouble. Another good thing is they're grown on their own roots instead of being grafted. So any root suckers are the same variety and they're easy to propagate.

    As a pie cherry, it's self fruitful. Sweet cherries need a second variety for pollination and not all are compatible. Flavorwise, it's supposed to be halfway between a sweet cherry and a pie cherry. Which is a good place to be, in my opinion, because pie cherries have a much more intense cherry flavor.

    New varieties originate (mostly) from people planting seeds and seeing what they get. But the huge majority of seedlings are inferior to the parent tree. If you want fruit, not an experiment, don't start your tree from seed.
    Bruce in CT

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    I don't really care if it has cherries on it or not,lol.I just wanted to see if it will grow into a tree from the seeds I have,lol. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_n_32.gif[/img] ~Niki~ [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_m_32.gif[/img]
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    Beware of the yellow snow!

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    Whats it to ya? Finch's Avatar
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    wild cherries are more hardy than the cultivated counterparts and may be more desiarable for as trees in the long run. Like black/wild cherry, pin cherry, and choke cherry... since you dont want the fruit. The frits of some of these trees are... tolerably edible [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_n_32.gif[/img]
    that makes no logic

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