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Thread: Very interesting discovery

  1. #9
    War. War never changes. Est's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]other pigments are red, yellow, brown, etc. and use other wavelenths of light...
    Carotenoids (carotenes and xanthophylls.) [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile.gif[/img]

    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]...so I don't see why we would need the bacteria... there are plants now that can grow in lower light levels so why not use say a wintergreen gene and put it in CPs to make them grow in shade like wintergreen do?
    Well, the simple fact of it is that it'd be a pain in the rear to isolate and extract the sections (who guarentees it's just one gene?) coding for shady requirements from a wintergreen. First off, a wintergreen has a big genome, it would have to be sequences and all of the locales of the genes controlling what light levels the plant grows best in would have to be located, isolated, and replicated. It'd be quite difficult even if you were only looking at the chloroplast's DNA.
    Bacteria on the other hand are beauties for things like this. Working with a smaller genome, it'd be easier to isolate what you're looking for and you have the benefit of operons as well... Oh the joys of DNA. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_n_32.gif[/img]
    Gee, you know, this makes me think- it really has been a while since I did any of that... lol So if I muck up on some aspect or left something out, feel free to let me know. But, alpha, some very nice points, as usual. ( I'm a biology buff, too [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_n_32.gif[/img] )
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  2. #10

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    ah... I should have guessed
    I'm not very good with all the molecular biology, chemistry, physics, etc.
    Talk sense to a fool and he calls you foolish-Euripides
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  3. #11
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    I don't have any direct experience, but I've heard the "black" S. alatas grow much more slowly than others. If true, one possible explanation is that all that pigment captures light that would otherwise support photosynthesis. Lots of plants use red pigments to absorb excess light and protect chlorophyll. That's why many turn red in strong light and why many red clones stay green in lesser light. But the red pigments don't photosynthesize.
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  4. #12

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    after some research, I found out that
    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]Many leaves contain other pigments as well, and while these pigments can't photosynthesize as chlorophyll can, some of them are able to transfer the light energy they capture to the chlorophyll
    http://www.sciam.com/askexpe....588F2D7
    so while they don't directly photosynthesize, they do help to photosynthesize by absorbing the energy necessary. They do also protect from free radicals and other stuff.
    very interesting... It's all falling into place now.
    Talk sense to a fool and he calls you foolish-Euripides
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  5. #13
    War. War never changes. Est's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ] If true, one possible explanation is that all that pigment captures light that would otherwise support photosynthesis.
    The pigments within plants are photosynthetic. Well, there are some that are for protection but I don't think that having useless pigments sucking up all the useable light is responsible for them growing slow. Protective pigments still aid the photosynthetic process.

    Edit: Well, now that I've read the article, it's all really said their anyway. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_n_32.gif[/img] Oh well. The real fun starts when you start to analyze the photosystems- the first one is photosystem II the 2nd one is photosystem I because they're numbered in order of discovery. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_l_32.gif[/img] Oi.
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    Hi guys,

    Herenorthere, you're correct, the wavelengths absorbed by the bacterium are within the red.....that's what I get for just reading the abstract! [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_m_32.gif[/img]

    Est, I would agree that bacterial transformation is the way to go. They have small and manipulable genomes, resilient, take up little space and are very fast growing. Though there are fewer instances of bacterial genes being inserted into plant or animal genomes, it has been done. And I can't begin to count the number of times non-bacterial genes have been inserted into bacterial genomes for the rapid production of a valuable protein!

    And guys, I think we can all agree with theAlphawolf that most plant chlorophylls do not function alone but in concert with other pigments (e.g., xanthophylls) as part of light-harvesting complexes of those annoying photosystems (I and II). So, the xanthophylls are important players in photosythesis.

    And I would argue that technically, chlorophyll does not photosynthesize; photosythesis is a complex series of reactions geared toward the production of glucose using light as energy. The sum of all these reactions--from the harvesting of light to fixing of CO2 to H20--is photosynthesis. Without all those mysterious cofactors (NADH), etc, chorophyll wouldn't get too far!
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