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Thread: What is the purpose of rinsing peat?

  1. #9
    ChronoKiento's Avatar
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    Do you rinse the peat with just regular water? I never have enough distilled water. (I don't have any right now and my mom keeps forgetting to stop at the store and get me some. >.<) I know for a fact that my tap water is definately not suitable for CPs too. There's just too many farms around..but then again, I don't always have a choice....like right now.... Let the guilt rain down. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_h_32.gif[/img]
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    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    Personally, I have used both tap and streamwater for rinsing purposes. I don't see a problem for just rinsing, not if you will be using distilled afterward.

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    I use rainwater for the rinsing purpose. Tap water followed by rain might be ok, at least it would work here. I would think that depends on your water quality.

    Dustin I don't like to wait either which is why all my pots are made up well in advance of the need for them.
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    You know something, I had one batch of sphagnum peat that did in fact build up with nasty mushy gushy icky algae and I did end up with fungus gnats. I always wondered about that but you have explained it wonderfully. It was an off brand of some sort that I had picked up at a garden center. It was easy to spot that particular peat as it was a considerably different color than the Canadian spaghnum peat I normally use. I have a TDS meter and I have one of those trays left that had the algae in it. I can go and test it but I'm sure it will be the highest reading I've ever seen based on your cyanobacteria comments. For me, it may not be practical to rinse all of my sphagnum peat but I am going to begin rinising any and all peat I use for germinating seed indoors. Just makes good sense to do so after reading comments here. Thanks!

    Quick question for Tamlin, any tricks to rinsing large quantities for a decent sized bog? There will be an epdm liner containing the sphagnum. Bottom drain and let ma nature do her thing for one season before planting in it? Ugh, this is sounding extremely labor intensive. The more I think of it, the more I'm thinking you have a convert to rinsing peat.

  5. #13
    Moderator Schmoderator Fluorescent fluorite, England PlantAKiss's Avatar
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    I too have used tap water for initial peat and sand rinsing. But only in the first stages. Then the last couple of rinses I use rain water. I also top-water so that continues the leeching process.
    "Fox terriers are born with about four times as much original sin in them as other dogs." - Jerome K. Jerome

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    Moderator Schmoderator Fluorescent fluorite, England PlantAKiss's Avatar
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    Just bumping this.
    "Fox terriers are born with about four times as much original sin in them as other dogs." - Jerome K. Jerome

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    Capslock's Avatar
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    Nobody has mentioned microwaving peat, which I do in addition to the rinsing (I do it first.) My rinsing protocol may even be more complex than Tamlin's. I don't wait two weeks for the peat to soak, but rather just long enough for a decent portion of the peat to sink, leaving a floating amount on top. Usually about 30% sinks. This sunken mass is usually a black, goopy sludge that I don't use. I take the floating stuff, and wring it out and put it into a new bucket to repeat the rinsing one more time. I usually let the original unwashed peat sit in water overnight or at least for several hours before separating out the floating good stuff from the slimy bad stuff. Note: There is a lot less of the sludge with good quality peat.
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    Moderator Schmoderator Fluorescent fluorite, England PlantAKiss's Avatar
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    Good point Capslock. I've microwaved peat as well...to kill bacteria and unwanteds.

    You end up with a steaming hot pile of poo-looking material that's pretty sterile.
    "Fox terriers are born with about four times as much original sin in them as other dogs." - Jerome K. Jerome

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