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Thread: What is the purpose of rinsing peat?

  1. #17
    Capslock's Avatar
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    LOL, PAK! I actually microwave it when it's "dry", before the rinsing. There is still enough moisture in it to cook it, but it's a lot less, well, ugly than a big wet steaming lump!

    Capslock
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    Moderator Schmoderator Fluorescent fluorite, England PlantAKiss's Avatar
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    LOL That's funny because I always nuked mine wet. But you know...your way sounds a llllllllot prettier! I never even considered nuking it dry. I guess I thought it need the water to "boil" the bacteria.
    "Fox terriers are born with about four times as much original sin in them as other dogs." - Jerome K. Jerome

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    I cook my soil mixtures in the oven at about 180-200 degrees for a an hour or two. Is that as good as microwaving, or do you think there could be some ill effects from doing this?
    Slave to vegetable hunger.

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    180 usually cooks it pretty well. Actually, I prefer the oven to the microwave because it seems to heat the medium more evenly and there are 3 racks in the oven so I can do a lot more than by using the microwave. I am pretty good about baking or microwaving any medium that I might be re-using but I often "skipped" that process when using fresh sphagnum and as indicated above, sphagnum can be pretty darn inconsistent from product to product.

  5. #21

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    Hi Laura,

    Yeah, that would be a lot of hand wringing for a bog for sure. If your bog has drainage (and it should I believe), the rains will do the work over time. I even keep my bale of peat outside where the rain can get to it, and use the top layers first. Some people feel the issue is a tempest in a teacup, but good growing means maximizing all conditions and small increments can lead to big improvements.

    Caps is correct: there is no real need to wait 2 weeks, I am just lazy and that much time allows the peat to hydrate without a lot of my effort to moisten it. I too use only the floating matter, avoiding the sludge
    "Grow More, Share More"

  6. #22

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    Interesting thread. Since I started growing ('98 or so) I have never rinsed peat. I do get some algae, but that's easily eliminated. Fungus gnats, I think that's a given with wet soils, no matter what. Plus, they make for a good food source. Maybe i've just dodged bullets, but I haven't seen any ill effects on my plants. They've gotten bigger and better looking every year since I started. I don't know how many plants I have now. Including all the weeds (sundews, bladderworts), misc. forbs that have somehow sprouted up (orange milkwort, meadow-beauty, rushes, god knows what else) I would guess over 300. I have lost only 2 plants that I am aware of, ever. And all I use for soil is unrinsed sphagnum peat.

  7. #23

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    I don't quite know what I'll do about the big bog but I don't need to worry about that right about now anyway. I was going to consider repotting a few plants but then you just mentioned the obvious above, "the rains will do the work over time". I don't quite know how to address the drainage issue as most bogs that occur naturally have no drainage. I need to think about that for a while. If I do not rinse the peat being used and get a "loaded" batch, there will be impurities building up over time. That doesn't sound good to me.

    As far as plants in pots, I will leave what I have already potted alone. When it comes time to repot, they get rinsed peat. The peat I will use in the future to germinate seed will get rinsed and nuked. Seems as if this is just a plain old good habit to get into

    What is so wrong with using the sledge? A few people seem to be removing it.

    editing to add-

    Oops, I was typing when you were typing. You know Aaron, your sarracenia plants blow mine out of the water, literally. I suspect there is probably leeway in the arena of pots with plants grown outside for just the reasons mentioned above in that over time, the rains will flush the pots. I don't think there is much allowance for trays in which seedlings are being germinated and I really do need to rethink that bog issue because that will for all practical purposes, have no drainage. Perhaps leaving the bales out?

    I think the big difference is that growing inside eliminates the ability for Mother Nature to do her thing and it is difficult to recreate what she does so effortlessly. Probably one of the reasons why winter sowing can be so successful. No damping off issues with which to contend no matter what medium you use within reason.

  8. #24
    Cardiac Nurse JB_OrchidGuy's Avatar
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    LauraZ5 I don't have a pond/bog yet. I was thinknig about putting one in when I coud afford one. The "coffee water" I was refuring to was when I mix up peat and put it into pots and then top water the water that comes out the bottom is coffee or tea colored. This was the coffee water I was refuring to. I;m upset that the pod/bog idea will not work. What I wanted to do was get a couple of the preformed pond liners and set the pond section flush with the ground and then set the bog section slightly higher in the ground. Then the only connection between the two was going to be one or two pieces of PVC piping that would run from one to the other and across to the other side of the bog pond. Then I was going to drill hiles in the PVC piping that is inside the bog pond so that the water equals out and the level of the pond would be the level of the bogs water. Thats the reason the bog was going to be set a little high than the pond side. This was to keep the water level high enough of the bog and the bog always had fresh water. Well atleast enough from the bog/pond water was concered. The only filters I was planning on using were the carbon filters normaly for bogs. I understand the PH factor but what is the other factor you were talking about? It seemed like a good idea and seemed like it owuld work, but I will have to take someone elses experience untill I have some money to burn and give it a try.

    Oh and thanks everyone else for your rinsing techniques and reasons for rinsing. Everything makes sence and I will addapt some things into my setups.
    JB
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