User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Page 16 of 25 FirstFirst ... 6121314151617181920 ... LastLast
Results 121 to 128 of 199

Thread: Don't worry, god's in control

  1. #121
    BANNED
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    883
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Yea, sort of like jupiter if you ask me.

  2. #122
    War. War never changes. Est's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Champaign, IL
    Posts
    3,935
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]I tought brown dwarfs were masses of matter that didnt quite have the mass requierd for nuclear fusion.
    You have NO idea how difficult it is to resist making a potty joke right now.
    \(_o)/ ಠ_ಠ
    My Growlist
    NASC Website Come join in on the fun!

  3. #123
    Cardiac Nurse JB_OrchidGuy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    SC
    Posts
    3,818
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Interesting. I learns alot from a thread that started off talking about god and now evolved into stars. LOL Scott thanks for the info, and a physicist cool. Science has always interested me, and I have had one clas in pysics back in HS, but I went the medical rought. If you don't mind me asking what are you researching or doing as a physicist. I'm just curious is all. Like I said I find science very interesting, and understanding how things work. Oh ans sorry about the 15 million and 5 billion thing. Yes they are very different numbers. Seperated by alot of zero's, but for all practical purposes to use who just know a little about science its long enough either way to know we wae not going to be around long enough to see it. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_m_32.gif[/img] Also Scott if you didn't mind I would like to conversate with you about what a physicist does in a new thread or a PM.
    JB
    Friend me on facebook with JB_orchidguy@yahoo.com.
    Growlist Updated 05/08/13

  4. #124
    BANNED
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    883
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I too am interested [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_m_32.gif[/img] .

  5. #125

    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Houston TX
    Posts
    975
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (lol @ Aug. 03 2005,10:10)]I spent years studying black holes. Smaller stars can die in explosions known as novas. More massive stars die in supernovas. Even lager stars go supernova, then collapse back into black holes. As far as dead stars go, you have neutron stars, white dwarfs, brown dwarfs, and red giants are dying stars. Still more powerful explosions are thought to occur when two black holes collide, or explode. Theese form super strong gamma ray bursts. Then I forget what pulsars and quasars are. Sarraceniascott, do you know anything about zero point, quantum physics, or psychoenergetics? Since your a physicist and all [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/biggrin.gif[/img] .
    A "nova" is sort of the same setup as a Type I supernova, escept you have a white dwarf well below the maximum mass limit (the Chandrasekhar Limit, ~1.4 solar masses). As hydrogen from the red giant companion to the white dwarf accretes onto the white dwarf, it compacts until enough it there, then it suddenly and catastrophically fuses, producing a brief, bright burst.

    This does NOT destroy the white dwarf; novae can recur.

    In a Type II supernova, a very large star fuses elements in its core all the way up to iron, which cannot be fused to release more energy. With no radiation pressure acting against gravity, the massive atmosphere of the star begins falling inward, compressing the iron core to such a degree that the electron shells are crushed (electron degenerate pressure cannot support more than 1.4 solar masses), and the protons beta-decay into neutrons (hence, the name neutron star). This process releases an enormous flood of neutrinos. The neutron core rebounds a bit, kicking the inward falling shell back outward with a collosal shcok wave that rips through it at a significant fraction of the speed of light. The neutrino burst also deposits a lot of energy into the envelope (neutrinos don't normally interact with matter much, but it is SO dense that they now can). The envolope rips away as the shock wave travels through it, and the supernova is born.

    The first outward effect is the neutrino burst; that would be observed at the surface of the star before any other changes were noted, several hours before the star rips itself to pieces.

    What is left behind is a neutron star; if the star was massive enough, even the degenerate neutron pressure cannot support the mass, and it collapses into a black hole.

    In Type I supernovae, in contrast, you have a white dwarf companion to a red giant; the white dwarf is just a shade under the Chandrasekhar limit, and as mass accretes from the red giant to the white dwarf, it exceeds the limit, and collapses. In this kind of supernova, however, the core destroys itself completely, leaving nothing behind. Rather than becoming a neutron star, the nuclei in the white dwarf rapidly all fuse, and the resulting energy release disrupts it completely.

    A brown dwarf is not a dead star, but a failed one. Maximum mass of a brown dwarf is about 8% that of the sun; they are massive enough to initiate fusion of deuterium in their cores (an isotope of hydrogen), but cannot ignite the hydrogen.

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) are still not well understood; they may be the merging of two black holes, or they may herald the creation of a black hole as a very large star collapses, or they may be something else.

    Pulsars are rapidly spinning neutron stars with strong magnetic fields which emit intense beams of radiation.

    Quasars are now thought to be the cores of active galaxies, essentially the radiation signature of matter accreting into a supermassive black hole (millions or billions of solar masses).

    The last I heard of zero-point energy in a proper science context was in an into quantum mechanics class. Wikipedia has a decent article on it.

    Most advanced physics is quantum physics; what do you want to know about it?

    As for psychoenergetics, that sounds like pseudoscientific mumbo jumbo; I've never heard of it.

    My focus was in high-energy astrophysics, specifically supernovae.
    My Grow List

    "We are just an advanced breed of monkeys on a minor planet of a very average star. But we can understand the Universe. That makes us something very special." -- Stephen Hawking

  6. #126

    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Houston TX
    Posts
    975
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (JB_OrchidGuy @ Aug. 04 2005,3:01)]If you don't mind me asking what are you researching or doing as a physicist.
    Actually, I'm no longer in academia. I stopped short of finishing my Ph.D. As much as I loved physics, I didn't enjoy experiment; I preferred theoretical. But I wasn't smart enough to make a significant contribution; I would have been a support scientist running computations for somebody else. So I got an MBA with a focus on quantitative finance, and am now a quantitative analyst in the energy business. I write computer simulations to value their natural gas transportation and storage assets.

    My sister-in-law is also a non-practicing physicist: She DID finish her Ph.D., and is currently a stay-at-home mom.
    My Grow List

    "We are just an advanced breed of monkeys on a minor planet of a very average star. But we can understand the Universe. That makes us something very special." -- Stephen Hawking

  7. #127

    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    1,866
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I thought Ph.D. stood for Post Hole Digger degree? Well, heck, I already have that! [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_n_32.gif[/img]
    \"Some cause happiness wherever they go; others, whenever they go.\"
    -- Oscar Wilde

    http://www.nasarracenia.org/

  8. #128
    Stay chooned in for more! Clint's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Metro Atlanta Area
    Posts
    9,681
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    quantum physics is fascinating. i have no interest to pursue anything dealing with it besides a PBS special, though lol.

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •