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Thread: Weird stuff

  1. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]They realy solely on their relationship with different funguses for their nutrients.
    apparently fungi also give them glucose? if they don't photosynthesize, are they parasites on the fungus? What do they give back in return? You can't live solely on nutrients... you need carbohydrates.
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  2. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]I duno why fungus is considered a bad thing. Many plants benfit from a relationship with fungus.
    Well, have you ever seen a "faerie ring"?? There's a mushroom, then it spreads out in a ciricle pattern, the old ones die off, so what you're left with is a dead inside of a circle and then a ring of mushrooms, then living grass and such on the outside. The mushrooms take the nutrients, killing what was there before. So, the fact is that while some mushrooms would play nice with your plants, others would not. I dunno, I think mushrooms are cool, especially now that I know a bit more about them, they really are interesting. And yummy. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_n_32.gif[/img]

    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]apparently fungi also give them glucose? if they don't photosynthesize, are they parasites on the fungus? What do they give back in return? You can't live solely on nutrients... you need carbohydrates.
    95% of vascular plants have root symbiosis with fungi (mycorrhizae). One example where it's expecially noticeable is in legumes (peas, etc, etc on the roots you see nodules that have formed by a fungus. The fungi increase the root's surface area allowing the plant to get more nutrients and they get sustinence from the plant (because it gets shipped down to support the roots.) In the instance of legumes, there are further bacteria that reside within the nodules, they are nitrogen fixing bacteria that take nitrogen from the air and bind it to the soil, or sulphur releasing bacteria which make nutrients in the soil avaiable ("or aid in", rather, because plants do some of that on their own.) Oh, and by the way, a lot of the time you can buy seeds (or do so without even knowing it) that have been treated with bacteria so the nodules are sure to form. And there you have it.


    As for the picture, I have no idea what kind of fungus that is, sorry. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_o_32.gif[/img]

    --Edit: Just remembered the bit about the underground orchid- Rhizanthella gardneri grow completely underground, even the flower tip doesn't break the ground's surface. They live off of the decaying material of broom honey myrtle stumes and are linked to said stumps by a fungus. They were only dicovered because the flowers, while not appearing above ground, do make cracks in the ground. They're very interesting but VERY rare (at least this species sure is).
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    ok, but what about the underground orchid? How exactly does that work? is it a parasite on the fungus or does it have a mutualistic symbiotic relationship with it? if so then what does it give back if it can't photosynthesize?
    regular plants photosynthesize and give glucose back to the fungus in exchange for nutrients, but obviously the orchid can't photosynthesize.
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  4. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]--Edit: Just remembered the bit about the underground orchid- Rhizanthella gardneri grow completely underground, even the flower tip doesn't break the ground's surface. They live off of the decaying material of broom honey myrtle stems and are linked to said stumps by a fungus. They were only dicovered because the flowers, while not appearing above ground, do make cracks in the ground. They're very interesting but VERY rare (at least this species sure is).
    There's the answer for most of it... As for the fungus, there's nothing to be had from the Orchid. As I understand it, it just works as a bridge between the stems of the broom honey myrtle. I imagine that the fungus is doing it's thing decomposing the stem then the orchid shows up. I suppose I can't expain it too well because I don't know all the details, but then again it doesn't seem like anyone out there seems to know an awful lot about them! Shame, I'd love to learn more about it.
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  5. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]As for the picture, I have no idea what kind of fungus that is, sorry.
    I already said it was a Scutellinia species. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/biggrin.gif[/img]

    As for the interaction between Rhizanthella gardneri and fungi; it may be commensal (+ 0) or exploitative (+ -). Not everything has to be mutualistic [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_m_32.gif[/img]

    Amori

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    I know it doesn't have to be mutualistic, that's why I asked if it was a parasite.
    I don't see how it could be commensalism though. Surely the fungus could grow faster if the orchid wasn't stealing it's food! even if the fungus is getting it's food from the myrtle? is the relationship between the myrtle and the fungus mutualistic?
    so the myrtle gives glucose to the fungus in exchange for nutrients, and then the orchid comes in and steals food/nutrients from the fungus.
    basically just like Monotropa uniflora (I've seen wild Monotropa uniflora and Monotropa hypopithys [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/biggrin.gif[/img] )
    http://botit.botany.wisc.edu/toms_fungi/oct2002.html

    pics of the orchid:
    http://members.iinet.net.au/~emntee/...gardnerii4.htm
    http://members.iinet.net.au/~emntee/...gardnerii5.htm
    http://www.arkive.org/species....e=large
    Talk sense to a fool and he calls you foolish-Euripides
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  7. #15

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    Sorry, I didn't pay attention to where the conversation was at. Monotropa are wicked plants.

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