User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 9 to 16 of 21

Thread: I'v finnaly figured out what i want to do with my

  1. #9

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    907
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I would suggest taking botany/horticulture as a minor or as a second major.

    Biology major with a double minor is what I would recommend. Minors in botany/horticulture and Environmental Economics/science.

    DNR jobs are looking for the Biology major, atleast here in WI. I am taking a 2 year degree that is a broad base shot at everything the DNR/Park services does. My program will leave me highly under qualified for a DNR job besides a grunt. However I don't plan on working in the DNR or Park services, I plan to stay private sector.
    \"Anyway, no drug, not even alcohol, causes the fundamental ills of society. If we're looking for the source of our troubles, we shouldn't test people for drugs, we should test them for stupidity, ignorance, greed and love of power.\"
    --P. J. O'Rourke
    GL

  2. #10
    herenorthere's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    almost Hartford
    Posts
    3,785
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'd suggest just starting on a BS in Biology. The first two years are mostly math and chemistry and physics and foundation biology classes and non-major electives. Those humanity and social science electives give you an opportunity to get a background in anthropology or political science or whatever. Like a language. Lots of important biological literature is in German or French. But I think becoming fluent in Spanish might be even better.

    Go to school at a good public university, not an overpriced private one. I had a couple small and one significant change of major by the time I began my third year. It took me five years to graduate but, because it was in-state tuition, it was possible. My neighbor's daughter decided to go to an expensive private school and wanted to change her major after two years. But the extra year would have been without financial assistance and she couldn't do it. So the difference in tuition is why I got a degree I wanted and she didn't.

    The most important thing is to throw everything you have into whatever you choose to do. And notice that the forum member who seems to be most deeply immersed in CPs (and swamp water) is an electrician. A lot of people with great biology credentials spend their lives rubberstamping permits to disturb wetlands. Few lead Ozzy's life.
    Bruce in CT

    Madness is something rare in individuals — but in groups, parties, peoples, ages it is the rule. Friedrich Nietzsche

  3. #11

    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    132
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Finch,

    Along with making some recommendations, I’d like to address your comment “Not as a botanical garden curiosity of a formally wild plant, but in its natural habitat so it can continue its evolution in the habitat and wild where it belongs.” Keeping extinct or nearly extinct plants as oddities is something that very few botanical gardens do anymore. Nowadays, numerous public gardens (botanical gardens and arboreta) are leading the fight to keep plants from becoming extinct through numerous conservation, research, and educational activities. Just as one example, here at Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens, we have for eight years been conducting one of the few longitudinal studies in existence of Cypridium acaule – the pink lady’s slipper orchid, of which we have several thousand growing naturally on our grounds. The umbrella organization that covers most public gardens in North America is the AABGA (American Association of Botanical Gardens and Arboreta), within which, there is a committee that oversees the conservation activities engaged in by public gardens. The mission of the AABGA is ”dedicated to promoting people's appreciation and understanding of the irreplaceable value of plants.” See: http://www.aabga.org/public_....7498579
    Another organization you should be aware of the BGCI (Botanic Gardens Conservation International) at http://www.bgci.org.uk/

    Regarding your career interests, I applaud and admire you for taking an interest in what I believe is a most noble pursuit. You have age on your side and have lots of time to decide exactly what you want to do. In my forties I decided I wanted out of the medical field and wanted instead to spend the rest of my life helping people understand, value and enjoy plants. Some people have recommended you getting a degree in biology. Indeed, this would be good if you wanted to learn about a more diverse litany of subjects in the plant AND animal world. If you were specifically interested in plants, I would go for botany, or plant science. I obtained an undergraduate degree in plant science, and was then awarded a full fellowship for a master’s degree in public garden management at Cornell. The type of subjects I suggest you explore taking are: botany, plant physiology, taxonomy, integrated pest management, water resources, plant pathology, entomology, arboriculture, plant identification courses, geographic information systems, environmental design, soil science, etc. Fortunately I have never had to take physics!

    Please contact me if I can answer any questions.

    John

  4. #12
    herenorthere's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    almost Hartford
    Posts
    3,785
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hortman knows what he's talking about. My reason for recommending biology instead of botany is you'll see a wider range of things the first couple years. It never occurred to me to head into geology until I took the Geology for Engineers class as a sophomore Civil Engineer major. So I think new students should keep their options open.

    A lot depends, however, on what school you find yourself at. Some schools have created an artificially sharp boundary between the animal people and the plant people (and the microbe people too). A new biology student there might see very little botany. But that's what electives are for.
    Bruce in CT

    Madness is something rare in individuals — but in groups, parties, peoples, ages it is the rule. Friedrich Nietzsche

  5. #13

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Evanston, IL
    Posts
    836
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I am working on getting a degree in Natural Areas Management, but I also will have to take regular biology, botany and horticulture classes. It's probably too late for me to make a career in this area, but I want the knowledge more than anything. Good for you for starting young.
    \"People place their hand on the Bible and swear to uphold the Constitution; they don't put their hand on the Constitution and swear to uphold the Bible,\" Jamie Raskin, to Senator Nancy Jacobs.

  6. #14

    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Posts
    809
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Awesome, Finch! You'll also want to check out Environmental Science/Studies.
    A flytrap ate my homework!
    -Michelle

  7. #15
    StifflerMichael's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Dallas, TX
    Posts
    339
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Look at some schools with strong plant biology departments: The Ohio State University, UC Davis and Cornell (Ithaca, NY) are some that I know about. As a biology or botony major you will have to take classes in general chemistry, organic chemistry, general physics, as well as math up to some calculus.

  8. #16
    Whats it to ya? Finch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    South Dakota
    Posts
    3,472
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thank you very much for your support and suggestions on courses everyone. I have a lot of stuff to look into [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile.gif[/img]


    LOL. No, ozzy, thats not your words, although it is very much true and is self-evident to many people so i might not be surprised if something similar to what i said may be in this forum somewhere.

    Hortman, I know botanical gardens are actively participating in saving endangered species, but they also contain species extinct in the wild and for whatever reason cant be returned. Without a firm genetic base the possibility that some plants can survive in the wild is slight.

    My only stumbling block now would be the math, but i think ill be able to handle it.


    Environmental science and botany eh? I thought there was something more specific than that.... and i suppose i should do geology too becasus soils are important to the plant life. Actually i think soil sciences would be more specific.

    I have a lot to think about.

    Thanks again all.
    that makes no logic

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •