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Thread: Winter dormancy

  1. #1

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    Unhappy

    So yeah I grow indoors in a box. I was wondering if any of my plants need a winter rest? Heres a list and some pics:

    D. binata T-form
    D. binata multifida
    D. capensis 'Narrow Leaf'
    D. capensis 'Albino'
    D. spatulata
    U. bisquamata
    U. dichotoma
    U. livida
    U. sandersonii
    U. longifolia
    U. subulata
    U. tricolor
    G. violacea (giant)
    S. alata (seeds in cold stratification right now; they'll be ready to plant around Oct 31st) seems fitting lol >;-D


    My grow list

    pics
    Vini, Vidi, Vichi

  2. #2

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    yes
    no
    no
    no
    no
    the utrics i don't know, I think sandersonni doesn't need a dormancy
    and I think sarrencia seedlings can skip dormancy for 1 or 2 years.

  3. #3

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    So the binata t-form needs a rest?? And the other sundews dont. So now i just need to find out about the utrics.
    My grow list

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    Vini, Vidi, Vichi

  4. #4
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    Coincidently, I have all of those plants. I can't speak for the Genlisea, since I have only had mine since this summer, but all of the Utrics have wintered over for me just fine on a window sill, where the temps naturally got down into the 60's. And of course their photoperiod was followed the seasonal pattern.

    As Brian indicated, the D. binata will shut down for the winter, while the others will slow down. My D. binata from last year, though, were kept outside into November, so they got got colder than the window sill plants, before I brought them in for the duration of the winter. By January, they began life anew. I wasn't sure if they were coming out of dormancy because they went from 30's->60's or because the photoperiod was increasing. Maybe both. I was concerned that they were coming out of it too soon, but the way they grew and flowered for me seems to indicate that they had adequate rest.

  5. #5
    Let's positive thinking! seedjar's Avatar
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    I don't think the D. binata complex needs dormancy. It will briefly go dormant if you leave it out in the dark and cold, but I've been told that it isn't necessary.
    Those Sarr seeds should maybe stay inside for their first year if they're almost done stratifying already. I think if they've been in the fridge this long, they'll be expecting spring-like weather when they germinate, and I don't know how they'll fare through winter. I believe Bugweed raises Sarr seeds indoors with high light levels and long photoperiods for an entire year before putting them outside for their first dormancy.
    ~Joe
    o//~ Livin' like a bug ain't easy / My old clothes don't seem to fit me /
    I got little tiny bug feet / I don't really know what bugs eat /
    Don't want no one steppin' on me / Now I'm sympathizin' with fleas /
    Livin' like a bug ain't easy / Livin' like a bug ain't easy... o//~

  6. #6
    scottychaos's Avatar
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    The ICPS says D.Binata needs dormancy.
    I would believe them.

    http://www.carnivorousplants.org/see...s/D_binata.htm

    I have put my big D. Binata in the fridge with my VFT's and Sarrs every winter for 10 years..
    every spring when it comes out of the fridge it looks totally dead..all the leaves black.
    but it always pushes up new growth from below ground.
    the old leaves dont stay greenish like they do with VFTs and sarracenia, so it looks bad in the spring!
    but thats normal...

    "southern and eastern Australia, Tasmania, and New Zealand"
    has winters equilivant to the central US..
    http://www.discovertasmania.com.au/h...cfm?SiteID=552
    40's fahrenheit.
    about the same as VFT's native climate..a bit colder actually.

    Scot

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