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Thread: White powdery growth

  1. #1

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    Well, I've finally gotten over my algae hatred and learned to ignore most of it. Now, though, I've noticed the begininngs of a white powdery substance apparently growing in a couple of my pots. On the soil only, not the leaves. I suspect it is a fungus. I don't wish to harm my CPs, and I am begininng to prepare for dormancy issues anyhow. I have heard a fungicide bath is recommended before beginning dormancy.

    Can anyone recommend a fungicide brand, or other treatment that works and is not known to kill the CPs? I've heard of sprinkling cinnamon on the soil surface... I've also heard that sulphur-based fungicides can be used, or should be avoided, both (confusing). If I can avoid the use of 'cidal' agents, I will, simply because I grow my pretties inside, where I and my cats live (aside from potential larger enviromental effects). But I'd rather treat once, in an effective manner, and not stress out the plants with repeated 'experimental' treatments.

    For reference, affected species are:
    Darlingtonia californica
    Drosera adelae
    Sarracenia purpurea


    Thanks for the help all!

    Edit: I've also noticed a plate-like green growth in the S. purpurea pot and one of my VFT pots. I'll try to get a photo if I can.

  2. #2

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    I have had this same white powedry stuff on my inside plants soil also. I would like to know what it is also.
    John 3:16
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    chloroplast's Avatar
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    When I hear the words "white and powdery" on leaves or soil, I think mealybugs or fungus. A picture would help determine which, if any, of these is the case and the appropriate treatment. If it is a fungal infection, you must treat it immediately or it will be impossible to cure. If it's a mealybug problem, you need to do a quick transplant and probably spray the roots with an insecticide or dunk in hot water (this is the recommended treatment for most houseplants, but I've never attempted it on CPs).

    As for fungicides, I've used Captan on one of my Neps (twice in the past) and it didn't harm the plant. I've also heard good things about cinnamon but have never tried it. As for sulfur-based agents, I've never tried these as well but I do apply a light coating of sulfur powder on fresh cuttings to prevent rot, and this has worked well.

    As for insecticides, I've used a 1:1 solution of isopropanol:water on a Nep a couple of times in the past to kill off a light infestation of spider mites (and use this on virtually all of my houseplants). It worked wonderfully and did absolutely no damage to the pitchers or leaves. Incidentally, I previously sprayed separate solutions of Malathion (then Sevin) to try controlling the same infestation and they had some effect and did slight damage (only minor leaf burn). I believe both these insecticides are recommended in D'Amato's "Savage Garden" but I find a simple alcohol solution to be more effective, less damaging, safer and cheaper. You could probably try this on your Sars and cobra plant, but I wouldn't recommend it on drosera. There's an article in the most recent ICPS newsletter describing a systemic insecticide that works wonderfully on drosera--I can't remember the name now but I'll look it up.

    Again, pics would be helpful.

    Good luck.
    Secretary, New England Carnivorous Plant Society (NECPS) http://www.necps.org/
    Member, International Carnivorous Plant Society (ICPS)
    Member, North American Sarracenia Conservancy (NASC)
    Member, The Carnivorous Plant Society (CPS)

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    Okay, I tried to take a few pics, but they didn't turn out as good as I'd hoped.



  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (chloroplast @ Sep. 22 2005,4:10)]When I hear the words "white and powdery" on leaves or soil, I think mealybugs or fungus. A picture would help determine which, if any, of these is the case and the appropriate treatment. If it is a fungal infection, you must treat it immediately or it will be impossible to cure. If it's a mealybug problem, you need to do a quick transplant and probably spray the roots with an insecticide or dunk in hot water (this is the recommended treatment for most houseplants, but I've never attempted it on CPs).

    As for fungicides, I've used Captan on one of my Neps (twice in the past) and it didn't harm the plant. I've also heard good things about cinnamon but have never tried it. As for sulfur-based agents, I've never tried these as well but I do apply a light coating of sulfur powder on fresh cuttings to prevent rot, and this has worked well.

    As for insecticides, I've used a 1:1 solution of isopropanol:water on a Nep a couple of times in the past to kill off a light infestation of spider mites (and use this on virtually all of my houseplants). It worked wonderfully and did absolutely no damage to the pitchers or leaves. Incidentally, I previously sprayed separate solutions of Malathion (then Sevin) to try controlling the same infestation and they had some effect and did slight damage (only minor leaf burn). I believe both these insecticides are recommended in D'Amato's "Savage Garden" but I find a simple alcohol solution to be more effective, less damaging, safer and cheaper. You could probably try this on your Sars and cobra plant, but I wouldn't recommend it on drosera. There's an article in the most recent ICPS newsletter describing a systemic insecticide that works wonderfully on drosera--I can't remember the name now but I'll look it up.

    Again, pics would be helpful.

    Good luck.
    It is not a fungus or mealybugs IMO because I don't have this powedry stuff on the soil ntil I take the plant out of ot's humidity dome. I have these little cups with lids on them, and the plants do fine in them with almost 95% humidityy. After I take them out, this white stuff starts growing on the soil. If anybody knows what could cause this, I would greatly apprecaite it.
    John 3:16
    My grow list/want list
    Prior to the funeral home visit, we heard ~ "Hey'all watch this ! !"

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    I get that sometimes. It's nothing to worry about. Just mix the soil surface about a bit and it won't be visible.

    Peat doesn't stay pristine and as soon as it's open to the air all sorts of thing will want to colonize it. I can't think of anything on the soil surface that will do a plant any harm.
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  7. #7

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    Ok, I'm just as happy to leave well enough alone if I can. Thanks. This stuff is only really growing in pots not colonized by live LFS anyhow. Sooner or later the LFS will overtake the pitcher plant pots and then I'll be happy. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile.gif[/img]

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    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    I've seen that on occasion, like with P. primuliflora. I have just picked it out as best I could. It never seemed to cause any real problems.

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