User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 8 of 12

Thread: Reducing the photoperiod for winter

  1. #1

    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    2,073
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I have mostly tropical CPs in my terrariums (Drosera, Utricularia, Nepenthes) and I've been told that I should reduce my photoperiod for winter. Do I really have to do this? If these plants don't need a dormancy, why would someone have to reduce the photoperiod in winter?

  2. #2
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Western New York
    Posts
    18,768
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    They may not require a dormancy, but unless you've got plants that are indigeonous to the Equator, where there are no seasonal differences to speak of, there is a natural change in photoperiod. Think of let's say, southern Florida. There are many types of CP's that are native to the area, a lot of Sarracenia, for instance. While not to the extreme of something like the Arctic Circle, they experience a lessening of photoperiod in the winter and a lengthening in the summer. The plants are adapted to the normal ebb and flow of light throughout the year and they slow down, instead of go dormant.

  3. #3
    Let's positive thinking! seedjar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Olympia, Washington
    Posts
    4,064
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Plants and many animals use the time of year to tell what they should be doing. Even if your plants aren't ones requiring dormancy, they still have a biological clock that's keyed to changes in photoperiod and climate. The ubiquitous timed event is reproduction - species tend to breed at certain coordinated points in the year to maximize their selection of mates and provide their offspring with ideal conditions. What that means to you is that if you give your plants a varied photoperiod, they'll flower more easily, because they 'think' that they have a better shot at finding mates during certain parts of the year.
    ~Joe
    o//~ Livin' like a bug ain't easy / My old clothes don't seem to fit me /
    I got little tiny bug feet / I don't really know what bugs eat /
    Don't want no one steppin' on me / Now I'm sympathizin' with fleas /
    Livin' like a bug ain't easy / Livin' like a bug ain't easy... o//~

  4. #4
    chloroplast's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    824
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    True words of wisdom, but I like to live dangerously. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_m_32.gif[/img]

    I keep the photoperiod constant (14h) for those CPs that don't require dormancy and they seem to grow and flower fine with the conditions I provide. I tried reducing the photoperiod once and found that it placed my plants under too much stress as even good fluorescent lighting (6" under 80W cool white in 2x2' grow area) is not as intense or beneficial as bright sunlight and so the plants are probably under less-than-optimal growing conditions to begin with. But this is just for my conditions--if you are using high-output fluorescent lights, this may not be an issue for you.

    As for those requiring dormancy, I keep them together (separate from the tropicals) and gradually reduce the photoperiod (14-->9h) until I place them in the fridge. Unfortunately, since they are growing indoors, they experience a concommitent gradual temperature reduction of 10-15F (to ~65F), which is less than ideal but the best I can provide. They seem to be doing ok, though.
    Secretary, New England Carnivorous Plant Society (NECPS) http://www.necps.org/
    Member, International Carnivorous Plant Society (ICPS)
    Member, North American Sarracenia Conservancy (NASC)
    Member, The Carnivorous Plant Society (CPS)

  5. #5

    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    2,073
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    So Chloroplast, are you saying you just keep the photoperiod the same for your tropical CPs all year long with no problems?

  6. #6
    chloroplast's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    824
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    That's correct.
    Secretary, New England Carnivorous Plant Society (NECPS) http://www.necps.org/
    Member, International Carnivorous Plant Society (ICPS)
    Member, North American Sarracenia Conservancy (NASC)
    Member, The Carnivorous Plant Society (CPS)

  7. #7

    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    2,073
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Sweet [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/cool.gif[/img]

    Now I don't have to look at half-dead plants all through the winter!

  8. #8
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Western New York
    Posts
    18,768
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'm still going to take my temperate sundews and Utrics out of the lab and bring them home next week and let them get both reduced light and temps, until it gets too cold for them. The rest of them will get the reduced light and somewhat lower temps on the window sills.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •