User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 9 to 16 of 31

Thread: Uv lights?

  1. #9

    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    new jersey
    Posts
    10
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    i use a uvb bulb and it works great i never have any mold in a 96% humidity enviroment i think thats good also with minimal ventilation and my plants do awsome but they are pricey around $15-$30 i had one laying around also they stop giving off decent amounts of uvbs after about 6 months
    i love welding

    and of course CP's

  2. #10

    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Montana
    Posts
    283
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I was thinking about this the other day when I was in a pet shop and noticed UV bulbs for reptiles. Although plants may not use UV-A, and UV-B light, there is strong evidence that suggests that they have receptors that detect UV light and it plays a role in regulating development. Plants that are grown under continuous UV light are very compact, with expanded leaves. UV light also enhances anthocyanin production, which gives the plants a red color.

    It's a misconception to think that light only plays a role in photosynthesis. Light also helps regulate plant growth and develop. I think people tend to focus only on the spectrum of light that enhances photosynthesis, and forget about other wavelengths of light.

    Anyway, it would be an interesting thing to experiment with.

  3. #11
    chloroplast's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    824
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]There is strong evidence that suggests that they have receptors that detect UV light and it plays a role in regulating development. It's a misconception to think that light only plays a role in photosynthesis. Light also helps regulate plant growth and develop.
    Though I haven't read the primary literature, I would tend to agree as most organisms try to avail themselves to all potential resources. My main concern would be providing the wrong amount or balance of UV wavelengths, as the regulatory effects of a substance can differ widely based on its quality and/or quantity. Given that UV is more toxic to life than visible light, providing too much of the former would be far worse than giving too much of the latter.

    But as I said, I have no practical experience providing artificial UV to plants and my arguement rests on the assumption that the bulbs would provide more UV than the plants naturally receive (which is questionable).

    So, I think we're all eagerly awaiting the results of Elgecko's experiment!
    Secretary, New England Carnivorous Plant Society (NECPS) http://www.necps.org/
    Member, International Carnivorous Plant Society (ICPS)
    Member, North American Sarracenia Conservancy (NASC)
    Member, The Carnivorous Plant Society (CPS)

  4. #12
    I've got a magic window! elgecko's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    PA, USA
    Posts
    3,047
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Doing some reading it appears that UV-A light seems to be more beneficial to plants then UV-B. UV-B in to high a quantity can cause growth problems.
    I was trying to find out what percent of UV light hits the earth typically, but can not seem to find what I'm looking for.
    The reptile bulb I'm thinking of possible trying is a 7% UV-A and a 3% UV-B bulb.
    http://www.thatpetplace.com/Product....00.aspx


    My Grow List Updated 8/24/17

  5. #13
    I've got a magic window! elgecko's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    PA, USA
    Posts
    3,047
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Since I'm cheap I went with another bulb which cost half as much.
    Zoo Meds Flora Sun bulb.
    Looking at the graph of the output it has a small amount of UVA & B.
    http://www.zoomed.com/html/lites.php

    When it comes time to replace the other bulb in June, I'm debating on which to try. The Ultra Sun has more UVA then the Tropic Sun bulb, or maybe I'll just but another Flora Sun bulb.


    My Grow List Updated 8/24/17

  6. #14

    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Montana
    Posts
    283
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I use a combination of the tropic sun bulbs and cool white to grow Cephalotus. My friend works at a pet store, so I get to try out different types of lights. I get a vivid red color using the combination of bulbs that is similar to plants growing under the Australian sun:



  7. #15
    Let's positive thinking! seedjar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Olympia, Washington
    Posts
    4,064
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    At high intensities, UV light is harmful, but we're exposed to UV light all day when outside. Even with the cover of clouds or foliage, a significant amount of UV light still reaches our skin (ever get a sunburn on an overcast day?) CPs grow outdoors quite well, so obviously they can withstand some degree of exposure. Also, I don't think that companies would sell UV bulbs for small, exotic animals if they emitted enough radiation to cause problems. Hospitals, labs, stores and other facilities use UV fixtures to purify air and water; certainly, you could give one of those bulbs a try with few worries. It's not as though you're rigging up a UV laser or turning your grow area into a tanning bed; I suspect that even a small amount of UV light will yeild noticable effects on your plants over time. This is an interesting idea and I hope you keep us updated.
    Best luck,
    ~Joe
    o//~ Livin' like a bug ain't easy / My old clothes don't seem to fit me /
    I got little tiny bug feet / I don't really know what bugs eat /
    Don't want no one steppin' on me / Now I'm sympathizin' with fleas /
    Livin' like a bug ain't easy / Livin' like a bug ain't easy... o//~

  8. #16
    白人看不懂 Drosera36's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    z5/6, Rochester, NY
    Posts
    2,017
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Like what you guys said, they do use ultra violet lights to kill off bacteria in fish tanks, but those are just really massive amounts of light.
    He who can, does. He who can't, teaches. -George Bernard Shaw
    I love these shirts!!!
    My Growlist
    My Webpage

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •