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Thread: Broke Down And got lights

  1. #9

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    Wavelength is everything to a plant, remember light is both a particle and a wave. The wavelength is due to the frequency or the energy level of the wave, measured by the distance between wave crests or troughs. Unless the light is of the correct wavelength, the plant's chloroplasts will not absorb any energy usable for photosynthesis. Now these wave of light travel in packets called quanta (? check me); this is the particle nature of light and the higher the wattage the larger the quantity of quanta emitted for absorption by the plant. BUT...unless the quanta have the right wavelength, the energy will be reflected, absorbed as heat energy, or otherwise displaced, but most importatnly it will not contribute to rate of photosynthesis for the plant.



    Light quality is of greater importance to plants than the light quantity. The suggestion otherwise is moot.

    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]My lighting advice: Go by intensity, as in the wattage of the bulbs. The higher the wattage, the better the light. I don't deal with all that color temperature and spectrum mumbo jumbo [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_n_32.gif[/img]

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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]Light quality is of greater importance to plants than the light quantity. The suggestion otherwise is moot.
    Well all I know is that I've used cool white bulbs, daylight bulbs, and warm white bulbs and I've never seen a difference in how well plants grow under them. The only difference I've seen is when I up the wattage.

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    I don't know if it's just in my head or not, but to me I can feel heat on my hand when it is under one of the red lights, the plant and aquarium bulbs, but not any of the others, and all the bulbs are cool to the touch.
    \"Anyway, no drug, not even alcohol, causes the fundamental ills of society. If we're looking for the source of our troubles, we shouldn't test people for drugs, we should test them for stupidity, ignorance, greed and love of power.\"
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    GL

  4. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (PoWeRPSUHort @ Dec. 10 2005,7:38)]Wavelength is everything to a plant, remember light is both a particle and a wave. The wavelength is due to the frequency or the energy level of the wave, measured by the distance between wave crests or troughs. Unless the light is of the correct wavelength, the plant's chloroplasts will not absorb any energy usable for photosynthesis. Now these wave of light travel in packets called quanta (? check me); this is the particle nature of light and the higher the wattage the larger the quantity of quanta emitted for absorption by the plant. BUT...unless the quanta have the right wavelength, the energy will be reflected, absorbed as heat energy, or otherwise displaced, but most importatnly it will not contribute to rate of photosynthesis for the plant.
    Lol, I am going to make a question from this and ask my Biology teacher, just to see if she has a clue what you are talking about. We are getting the 6 week crash course on the plant kingdom... My school is a joke.
    \"Anyway, no drug, not even alcohol, causes the fundamental ills of society. If we're looking for the source of our troubles, we shouldn't test people for drugs, we should test them for stupidity, ignorance, greed and love of power.\"
    --P. J. O'Rourke
    GL

  5. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]Light quality is of greater importance to plants than the light quantity. The suggestion otherwise is moot
    I would respectfully disagree. It would do little good if the plant were exposed to light of the "correct" wavelength at a rate of one photon per day! Likewise, it would do little good if the plant were exposed to light of the "incorrect" wavelength at a very rapid rate. Thus, it seems evident to me that both the quality and quantity of light plants recieve are very important for their growth.

    It is perfectly plausible that a plant receiving a large quantity of poor-quality light could have a GREATER rate of photosynthesis than a plant receiving a small quantity of good-quality light. This is due to the fact that it is the "relative percentage of chlorophyll-absorbed light" that changes respective to wavelength. To provide a quantitative example, Plant-#1 exposed to 10 units of 490nm-wavelength light (absorbing 80% of such light) would absorb LESS useable light per unit time than Plant-#2 exposed to 2000 units of 510nm-wavelength light (absorbing only 1% of such light).
    Secretary, New England Carnivorous Plant Society (NECPS) http://www.necps.org/
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (chloroplast @ Dec. 11 2005,1:05)]
    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]Light quality is of greater importance to plants than the light quantity. The suggestion otherwise is moot
    I would respectfully disagree. It would do little good if the plant were exposed to light of the "correct" wavelength at a rate of one photon per day! Likewise, it would do little good if the plant were exposed to light of the "incorrect" wavelength at a very rapid rate. Thus, it seems evident to me that both the quality and quantity of light plants recieve are very important for their growth.

    It is perfectly plausible that a plant receiving a large quantity of poor-quality light could have a GREATER rate of photosynthesis than a plant receiving a small quantity of good-quality light. This is due to the fact that it is the "relative percentage of chlorophyll-absorbed light" that changes respective to wavelength. To provide a quantitative example, Plant-#1 exposed to 10 units of 490nm-wavelength light (absorbing 80% of such light) would absorb LESS useable light per unit time than Plant-#2 exposed to 2000 units of 510nm-wavelength light (absorbing only 1% of such light).
    As hawkeye pierce would say, chloroplast, you have a firm grasp for the obvious.


    I stated that quality AND quantity were important but that UNLESS the wavelength is within the correct range, it does the plant NO GOOD!

    The underlying reason for my posting in the first place was to DISPELL any misinformation that light qulaity is unimportant. That is an uninformed point of view and needs to be challenged.
    Quantitiy is important of course, but I never suggested that low light levels of good quality light would be good for CPs.

    BTW your example neds work, I can point you to a good plant physiology book.

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    Can't we all just get along? [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_n_32.gif[/img] [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/biggrin.gif[/img]

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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]BTW your example neds work, I can point you to a good plant physiology book.
    This is a good segue to the first statements I'd like to make: I am not a plant biologist. I'm an MD/PhD student pursuing neurology/neuroscience. My last exposure to college botany was way back in 2001 as a senior biology major. I've done some reading on the side, but indoor gardening is just a hobby--so if plant science is your "thing" you'll have to excuse some of my ignorance.

    That said, in my defense, the example wasn't meant to be a tome on the physiology of photosynthesis. Rather, it was meant to simply show that typically, quality and quantity of ambient light are both important. In what respect does the example need "work"? I believe the overall arguement is sound. For the actual numbers, I relied on an absorbtion spectrum of chlorophyll depicted in the text Plant Biology, TR Rost et al; Wadsworth Publishing, 1998. If this is what you are questioning, could you please provide a reference depicting what you believe is a more accurate absorbtion spectrum? Thanks.

    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]I stated that quality AND quantity were important
    I did not see this statement in your original post and I perceived the tone of your original statement to be biased in favor of quality over quantity. If I was mistaken, I apologize.

    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]UNLESS the wavelength is within the correct range, it does the plant NO GOOD!
    I would disagree with this. Plants use light in many non-photosynthetic physiological processes, so just because a wavelength cannot be used for the purposes of photosynthesis does not make it unuseful.

    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]The underlying reason for my posting in the first place was to DISPELL any misinformation that light qulaity is unimportant. That is an uninformed point of view and needs to be challenged.
    I fully agree. However, people on both sides of the fence have evidence supporting their view. Some people have seen greater benefit increasing quantity over quality and vice-versa. Much of these statements are based on uncontrolled experimentation, so it's best if one uses them simply as general guidelines and find what works best for one's self.

    As for myself, my plants seem very happy under cool whites, but I'm planning a small experiment to see whether some would do better under a mix under my growing conditions.

    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]Quantitiy is important of course, but I never suggested that low light levels of good quality light would be good for CPs.
    Nor did I state you did.

    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]Can't we all just get along?
    Mitch....always the voice of reason!! [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile.gif[/img] No wonder why you have such awesome terraria!

    I can't speak for PoWeRPSUHort, but I enjoy debating a topic every once in a while, so long as it remains reasonable, on-topic, and mature. Synapses are like muscle--if you don't use them you lose them! [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_m_32.gif[/img]

    Now, I've got to get back to watching my beloved Patriots wipe the floor (or snow-covered field) with the Bills!
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