User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 9 to 16 of 21

Thread: Paver Sand from Lowes?

  1. #9
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Western New York
    Posts
    18,768
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Who or what type of organization would carry sandblasting sand? Would someone in construction or a drilling company have it?

  2. #10
    xscd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Portales, New Mexico US
    Posts
    147
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Exclamation

    To Bugweed--

    hehe -- I just like it (sand). Maybe it's an irrational fondness. Also, it helps to add weight and substance to the polyurethane foam pots I now use for my VFT, like those made by Southern Patio, Southern Patio Foam Pots. Otherwise (if I were to use pure sphagnum) the pots might be too light (despite the water, or when the water mostly evaporates, as I often allow it to do with my VFTs (only with careful attention when outside, and only to the point of moist, never completely dry of course!)) and likely to blow over in the strong New Mexico, US, winds.

    Regarding the insulating foam pots I use, you mentioned (elsewhere) that VFT don't mind warm soil. However, here at 4000 feet, with less atmospheric buffer and few clouds in the sky at any time, the scorching direct sun can easily heat a conventional ceramic or plastic pot to the temperatures of an oven and literally bake the roots of plants grown in above-ground containers. It's a real problem. These 8 or 10 inch foam pots for 3-7 plant VFT colonies (and cheap styrofoam 16-ounce beverage cups for single young transplants) have been literally a life-saver for me.

    Oh--your plants are beautiful and your collection impressive, by the way! (saw them in the sarracenia section)


    To jimscott--

    In the rural/agricultural region where I live, both our local hardware store and a local home/garden business carry blasting sand (sandblasting sand). It is used to clean metal parts, in auto body and repair work, paint stripping, etc.

    In your area, you might ask a machine shop or an auto restoration business where they get their blasting sand. From bitter personal experience I avoid "play sand," and river and ocean sand contain rock particles that are not silica, some of which can dissolve in an acid soil environment and poison the soil--so to speak--with too many dissolved minerals and salts. Imagine what finely crushed limestone and various metamorphic and other types of rock would be like, compared to inert and insoluble almost pure silica.

    --Just my opinions, of course. To each, his or her own.


    Best wishes all--
    Be happy in the travel--there is no destination

  3. #11

    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Martinez, California
    Posts
    3,556
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Well now I know why you need sand! And growing in heat like that at 4000 feet! EEK! Seems you have adapted some growing techniques to your own personal niche, and it works well for you. Man, 90 to 95 degrees is warm for soil temps with live plants in it, but oven hot!?!?!?!?!? HOLY CROW!!!!!! THAT I have not experienced before. I hope to never have to!!!!!! Good job, Steven!
    Write a book. Call it, "CP at 4000 feet, and how to grow them." Won't sell many, but the growing techniques for your elevation should be worth their weight in GOLD!
    Around these parts, 110 degrees F. is not uncommon. Soil temps rarely reach the upper 80's to LOW 90's. Using white tubs for growing does help reflect heat. Plus, being so near the Pacific Ocean has some advantages. Like light sea breezes blowing through occasionally, humidity rarely below 15%. Admire your tenacity, XSCD!!!! Keep it UP!!!!!!!!!
    45 yrs. growin\'
    Founder NASC

  4. #12
    xscd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Portales, New Mexico US
    Posts
    147
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    When I first began to grow VFTs here in eastern New Mexico, US, at 4050 ft. elevation, a few were baked and died because of their containers. I was using glazed and unglazed stoneware at the time, both of which are vitreous (non porous, in contrast to low-fired common red clay pots), and standard plastic containers.

    I often placed some VFTs outside to catch some bugs and get some direct sun for a few hours, but one day when I came back to check them, the pots were too hot to hold (they burned my hands). It turned out that black or dark plastic or ceramic were the worst, and even the medium dark-green Kord square plastic seedling containers that I love (and which last almost forever!).

    So I began to shade my pots when they were outside, any way I could. I would place straw around the bases for example, with only the upper surface of the containers exposed to the sun.

    This was unsatisfactory in the long run, so I began to look for other solutions. One idea was to double pot the plants: to place each container in another larger one with perlite or vermiculite filling the space between and acting as an insulator.

    But then I discovered the lightweight polyurethane pots and began to use them for my VFTs, as well as cheap 16 ounce styrofoam beverage glasses instead of 3 or 4-inch traditional plastic seedling pots for my young transplants. They worked
    great! I was happy! My Venus Flytraps were happy and began to grow bigger and more vigorously. I have used the polyurethane foam planters ever since, although the smaller sizes (6-, 8- and 10-inch) can be a little hard to find at a reasonable price. The larger sizes cost a ridiculous amount.

    Regarding the 16-ounce and larger cheap styrofoam beverage containers, my VFTs (which can be surprisingly deep rooted) seem to appreciate the extra root-zone growing room when compared to the relatively more shallow traditional seedling pots.

    I have actually unintentionally "bonsai'ed" some of my VFTs by planting them in too small a pot. When transplanted into a larger pot with more room for their roots, most (I think all) have greatly increased both in the size of the rosettes and the size of the traps, some more than doubling in size. "Who knew?!" I was certainly surprised!
    Be happy in the travel--there is no destination

  5. #13

    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Martinez, California
    Posts
    3,556
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Well, I think that what you have contributed to the forums already has been phenomenal! What you have learned from the environment you are in is a first time success I ever heard of. Without a greenhouse that is!!! This is the stuff this forum is made of too. Learning. All the time learning. I have learned for the first time about growing sucessfully in arid semi-desert conditions without a Greenhouse, and I am jazzed! Hot drying winds would definitely put a damper on outdoor growing. Thanks for all the input. New stuff for many of us I am sure!
    45 yrs. growin\'
    Founder NASC

  6. #14
    xscd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Portales, New Mexico US
    Posts
    147
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Bugweed wrote:
    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]Well, I think that what you have contributed to the forums already has been phenomenal! [...]
    Thank you very much! You certainly are a nice guy (and experienced and knowledgeable with a fantastic collection!). A lot of the people on this CP forum seem to be very helpful, interesting, good people. I'm glad to be here and will try to contribute what I can, both in terms of discussion/information-sharing, and plants!
    Be happy in the travel--there is no destination

  7. #15
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Western New York
    Posts
    18,768
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (xscd @ April 23 2006,8:10)]To jimscott--

    In the rural/agricultural region where I live, both our local hardware store and a local home/garden business carry blasting sand (sandblasting sand). It is used to clean metal parts, in auto body and repair work, paint stripping, etc.

    In your area, you might ask a machine shop or an auto restoration business where they get their blasting sand. From bitter personal experience I avoid "play sand," and river and ocean sand contain rock particles that are not silica, some of which can dissolve in an acid soil environment and poison the soil--so to speak--with too many dissolved minerals and salts. Imagine what finely crushed limestone and various metamorphic and other types of rock would be like, compared to inert and insoluble almost pure silica.

    --Just my opinions, of course. To each, his or her own.


    Best wishes all--
    Thank you for the guidance!

  8. #16
    SpyCspider's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    San Antonio & Sugar Land, TX
    Posts
    203
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    hahahah good stuff from everyone,

    So should I take out the sand/peat mix and dump it? It did seem too fine when i was washing it and it also contained little clumps of what looked like clay for making the sand more viscous when mixed. Anyways, dormant sundews are sprouting from it but the sphagnum is a mat of dark-greenish goo as if it's covered with algae. The sundews that are sprouting don't look too healthy either. And can I soak the the dews in distilled water to clean them off? Thanks again.

    Johnny

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •