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Thread: Bog/pond

  1. #1
    God must have an interesting sense of humor Wesley's Avatar
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    My mom and I are wanting to set up a pond at our house next spring. I would like to be able to put CPs next to it and possibly in it. We would also like to be able to put fish in it. The problem is, if we put CPs next to/in it they'll need lotsa sun and one of our friends who also has a pond says it'll get algae if it gets sun. How do we prevent the algea without killing the fish and the plants or should we just scratch the CP in the pond idea?

    Here are a few pics of our friends pond. Notice our friends dog getting a refreshing drink.





    ~Wes~

    My plants are going green to save the environment

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    Always a newbie glider14's Avatar
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    Golden Retriever? i got one too!
    Alex
    Everything is explainable. The seemingly unexplainable is but a result of our insufficient knowledge.- Hans Brewer

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    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    Hmmm... looks like a good spot to grow a cobra lily!

  4. #4
    Let's positive thinking! seedjar's Avatar
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    Good water circulation helps reduce algae, and you can get plants and animals to help control what does grow. Freshwater clams, shrimp and mussels are good, as are tadpoles and aquatic snails. There are some fish that eat algae, but for the most part pond fish like koi and goldfish just get really big and funk up the water more than they clean it. Ask a local pond or aquarium shop for what types of critters will do well in your area.
    Another measure you can take is to build a biological filter; pump the pond water into a tall basin filled with layers of charcoal, porous rock (like pumice) and sand (CP-safe sand, ideally.) The output of the pump should be at the bottom of the container so that the water has to flow up. This causes particulate like algae and sediment to accumulate in the filter, where bacterial cultures will spring up and feed off of it. You can also fill the top of the basin with some quick-growing aquatics like water hyacinth to control excess nutrients in the water. Be careful with water hyacinth though, it's highly invasive and illegal in many states where it can survive year round in the wild. But if you live in an area where it freezes during the winter, then water hyacinth is easily controlled and makes a good pond plant.
    You can also just plant a lot of stuff in the pond to reduce algae. Algae needs lots of light and nutrients to grow. Vascular plants are more efficient growers than algae, so if there are enough plants in the pond to keep the nutrients low and shade the surface of the water, algae won't be able to keep up. Some things to try are bog irises, Saggitaria spp., cattails, water lilies, water plantains, lotuses, taros, cabomba grass, hair grass... the list goes on. A local shop should be able to direct you to the best species for your climate.
    Best luck,
    ~Joe
    o//~ Livin' like a bug ain't easy / My old clothes don't seem to fit me /
    I got little tiny bug feet / I don't really know what bugs eat /
    Don't want no one steppin' on me / Now I'm sympathizin' with fleas /
    Livin' like a bug ain't easy / Livin' like a bug ain't easy... o//~

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