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Thread: Humidity loss?

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    CopcarFC's Avatar
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    Alright I just got a tiny Hamata and to give it high humidity I made a makeshift terrarium by turning a glass cookie jar upside down on a dinner plate with the Hamata inside. So far humidity has been nice and high during the day but at night I needed a way to cool it down. So I froze a bottle of water and at night I put it inside the cookie jar. It seems to lower temps nice and low like a charm.

    But, for some reason when I put the frozen bottle in the jar the humidity dropped rapidly. The plant seemed fine and is blowing up a new pitcher but I'm kinda worried about the humidity drop. Why would putting a frozen bottle in the jar destroy humidity? I'm not sure how far it drops but all the condensation dries up and the plants leaves get dry.
    My life sucks

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    NECPS President Dave S.'s Avatar
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    My guess is that condensation pulls the water from the air to lower the humidity.

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    jrod's Avatar
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    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vapor_P...s_Temperatures

    Looks like the vapor pressure drops when the temps drop, leading to less water vapor in the air. Interesting chemistry there, I hadn't thought about that til now...

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    Moderator Joseph Clemens's Avatar
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    How are you measuring your humidity would be the first question I'd ask (some instruments respond more quickly than others).

    Certainly condensation on the cold bottle would quickly pull moisture out of the air, lowering the humidity, but, depending on how quickly the air in the enclosure chills, the humidity should stabilize as soon as the air temperature approaches the temperature of the cold bottle (though this may not be that desirable). Because humidity in this case isn't how much water vapor is in the air, but how much water vapor is in the air relative to the temperature and, to a lesser extent, the density of the air. This is why it is actually called --- relative humidity.

    Some of the wonders of thermodynamics.



    Joseph Clemens
    Tucson, Arizona, U S A

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    CopcarFC's Avatar
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    Heh, forgot about this thread

    Ok so the one pitcher I had died one night so I stopped useing the water bottle to cool it down. So now my Hamata is only getting around a 5 or 6 degree drop at night untill I can think of a way to cool it better.

    So far the plant seems to like these lowland type conditions and just opened a new pitcher a few days ago. But I'm sure this wont last, daytime temps are in the high 80's low 90's. With night time temps in the mid to low 80's. I'm sure the only thing keeping this plant alive is the constant 90%+ humidity.

    I dont know what I'm gonna do with it. From what I understand Hamata's get much easier to care for after they get bigger. But as a small plant they are a serious pain in the a$$ to keep alive. Wish me luck.
    My life sucks

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