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Thread: Next step from Normal Fluorescents

  1. #9
    Moderator Joseph Clemens's Avatar
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    Here is a photo of Drosera adelae grown under cool-white fluorescent lighting, with no natural light at all.





    Joseph Clemens
    Tucson, Arizona, U S A

  2. #10
    Hort. School dropout X 2
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    Joseph,
    That is one wonderful looking D. adelae. Of course it would look good you probably grow it the same way that you grow your delicious looking Pings.
    Lois
    Every seed that you plant ,doesn't sprout.
    Every seed that sprouts, doesn't make it to maturity.
    Every cutting that you stick doesn't grow roots.
    Every cutting that roots doesn't grow to a small plant.
    Every small plant doesn't reach maturity.


    Who needs speelcheck?

  3. #11
    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
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    Barry Rice in his book and on the ICPS FAQs says he's found no difference in growth due to the color temperature of fluorescent lamps. He says you're just as well of buying cheaper cool or warm white tubes than the more expensive daylight or "plant" tubes. The only thing he recommends is that you buy "name brand" tubes as they last longer and have a more consistent brighter light output then house or generic brands.

    Joseph's experience and opinion coincides with Barry Rice's.

    Carnivorous Plant FAQ: Light
    Grand Hotel... always the same. People come, people go. Nothing ever happens.

  4. #12
    Meaven's Avatar
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    hm, i was just trying too hard then. good to know. got a fan in my terrarium finally, too
    if i were ruler of the world, anyone who defined a nepenthene as a "companion plant" to orchids would be fired from a cannon atop mt. kinabalu.

  5. #13
    cp_produtos's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]1,360 - "Plant"
    1,900 - "Plant and Aquarium"
    1,720 - "Bright Daylight"
    2,025 - "Daylight"
    3,150 - "Cool White" ($2 a bulb)
    3,050 - "Daylight"
    3,400 - "Warm White"

    From this short list you can see a tube that may be like Joseph's "Cool White" puts out more than twice the light of a "Plant" tube.
    the only problem with your analisis is that the plants will use a lot more of the light that the "plant" tube emits than from the light the "Cool white" emits, those values in lumens are measure from the point of view of the sensitivity of the human eye , not the point of view of the plants , the value that have importance to plants is PAR = Photosynthetically Active Radiation , and that don't show up in the lamp caracteristics. This is because the spectrum that the plant use, don't correspond to the point of maximum sensitivity of the human eye.

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    joe002's Avatar
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    cp_produtos – yeah, I understand that plants don’t “use” light in the same way we “see” the light, and all things being equal (price, output, availability, etc.) a true “plant” light should be better. As is often the case they’re not equal in every category.

    At the link I posted, the 1,360 lumen “Plant” bulb did not identify a PAR value – or even the Color Temperature. Is the bulb designed to promote flowering, growth, or profit – hard to tell. I don’t know that a 1,360 lumen “Plant” bulb it is better for our CPs than the 3,510 lumen “Cool White” bulb – especially given the results of Joseph and others using basic “Cool White” lamps.

  7. #15
    chloroplast's Avatar
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    For the past three years, I've grown almost all of my CPs under cool white fluorescent lights. They were 3-9" under 160W (4 48" tubes, 3100 lumens each, 4100K) on a 15h photoperiod. For the most part, they've all done fine.

    That said, I just switched (as of a week ago) to fluorescent "daylight" bulbs (GE 40W, 3050 lumens, 6500K). As you can see, They put out just as many lumens as a cool white fluorescent tube but they have a better K. I got them on sale for not much more than the cool white tubes would cost. All other lighting parameters are as before. We'll see how they do.

    Be careful basing your decision on lumens: it is simply a measure of how much visible light it produces (to the human eye). It tells you little about how much light is actually efficiently useable for photosynthesis. Another almost useless parameter is CRI which is a measure of how close to its "true" color (color under natural sunlight) an object's color is under the light, based again on what it looks like to the human eye.

    PAR and, even better, PUR are better parameters to look at for the purposes of picking a bulb for your plants. Unfortunately, this information does not come on the packing for most bulbs. A bulb with a K of 5000-6500K produces good light for plants. The higher the K the more energetic the radiation. Cool whites put out ~4100K and are centered around "green" light. They are generally considered less efficient lighting for the purposes of photosynthesis than the daylight or sunlight bulbs, but the experience of many (such as Joe) puts that into question.

    Of course, in my opinion there are a couple of things to consider when buying a bulb:

    1. Expense: Just how much more efficient are the expensive daylight and sunlight bulbs compared to a combination of cool and warm white lights (or cool whites alone)? Is this worth the expense?

    2. Efficiency: Any bulb can be made more efficient by placing it closer to plants, by increasing the photoperiod, and by surrounding the plants with reflective material such as mylar.

    So, find the bulb that best meets your lighting (and wallet's) needs!

    Ken
    Secretary, New England Carnivorous Plant Society (NECPS) http://www.necps.org/
    Member, International Carnivorous Plant Society (ICPS)
    Member, North American Sarracenia Conservancy (NASC)
    Member, The Carnivorous Plant Society (CPS)

  8. #16
    Stay chooned in for more! Clint's Avatar
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    I feel like a crack addict. No light is ever enough for me. I need ATLEAST one more metal halide so I can expand my addiction I mean hobby into the basement.. hehe

    "One light is too many, a thousand is never enough"



    Remember guys, you have to look at your plants. Unless you want a radioactive purply color, i'd stear clear of those special plant lamps (or should I say luminares?)

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