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Thread: Circulating Bogs: How-to

  1. #17
    Cardiac Nurse JB_OrchidGuy's Avatar
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    MFH I am with you on this one. I understand what Bug is saying, but I cannot envision the water flowing out and not making a huge hole where it comes out. I too cannot wait to see some pictures. Bugs first circulating Bog is to die for!! I have a bunch of plants that are just dying for a new home!! The tubs I have them in outside are breaking down from the sun so Hurry guys! I need to do somethign about them come spring time.
    JB
    Friend me on facebook with JB_orchidguy@yahoo.com.
    Growlist Updated 05/08/13

  2. #18
    CopcarFC's Avatar
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    I'm curious what you guys do when things freeze up? I lost my pump this winter to the ice, do you remove the pump and just treat it like a normal pot and water it by hand? I also had a few tubes crack and split as they froze.
    My life sucks

  3. #19

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    HEY!!!!!! CCFC!!! Glad to see you bud! How go the VFT's??

    In the case of my working bog, the tubes are housed inside the huge base, and therefore do not freeze. Even though the frost was thick here this year, and the undrained containers froze, the sound of dripping water could be heard inside the water base of my set up. The soil surface was frozen to about 1/4 inch in depth, and still, underneath that, the water flowed and moved. Pinguicula's, ionantha, planifolia, and primuliflora, all survived the freeze. THAT blew me away. I expected to lose them the first night of the freeze that caught me unprepared for it. They live today, none the worse for wear! Even D. capillaris made it, and it does not freeze well in a pot in a water tray. If it works in Nature, why not work for you??
    45 yrs. growin\'
    Founder NASC

  4. #20
    CopcarFC's Avatar
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    Thanks for the welcome bugs. The VFT's are great, they are all outside freezing with everything else. Those are some tough little VFT seedlings.

    Okay, so when everything melts I'll build another bog that has all of the tubes and pump encased in a thick weatherproof base. Next year hopefully things will go better.
    My life sucks

  5. #21
    Stay chooned in for more! Clint's Avatar
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    A bog garden is a series of tubes.
    Just like the internet

  6. #22

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    I really like your bog garden. A very good concept that I may have to try this summer. I apologize, but I have a question about the oxygenation of the roots. I may be getting to technical (sometimes my chemistry and physics degrees get in the way of my thinking ). I understand the roots need some air (oxygen) to keep them healthy and prevent bacterial growth and rot. I also understand how water oxygenates when it becomes agigitated or falls through the air. I also understand that standing water in the pot becomes stagnant and can eventually lead to rot.

    My questions are:
    #1. Does the circulation of the water allows the water and gaseous air to pass over the roots?
    #2. Does the circulation of water allows it to be in contact with the surrounding air and preventing the formation of the "bad" bacteria from developing?
    #3. Or, do the roots use the dissolved oxygen in the water?

    What I'm not sure about are that the roots are like the gills of a fish or the inside of our lungs (or the skin of an earthworm).

    The fish's gills can extract the dissolved oxygen from the water so that it can survive. This is the reason if you have a bunch of fish in a tank, you need an aerator(sp?) to help increase the dissolved oxygen levels in the water.

    The inside of our lungs has a thin film of water on them (or similar to the skin of an earthworm). That film of water is not necessary to become oxygenated, but it allows oxygen to pass from the air through the cell lining of our lungs. Even if you pump a lot of oxygenated water into our lungs...you'll still drown. The same is true with earthworms. When it rains, the worms' holes become flooded and the worms leave their holes so that they won't drown. Their skins must be moist and exposed to the air for them to survive, but once you remove the water or if they have too much water, they die.

    Sorry for the questions. (It's past 3:00am, I've been recovering from a migraine, had 4 cups of strong coffee, and I can't get to sleep )

    Again, the setup is great. I can't wait to do the same. I just would like to know more of the biochemistry of the roots.

    Have a great day!
    Dwight

  7. #23

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    Yes! Your emoticon looks overamped from the caffeine!!!! Too much of a good thing!

    Your questions are well put. Being as the water is always moving below the surface of the soil base, the soil is wet from the water underneath it. As the water level drops through natural drainage, it pulls O2 into the soil on a regular basis, constantly oxygenating the base.
    The why's and hows, I will leave to the technical talking types. I only know it works, and works well. I experience few problems with the garden other than the occasionally failing pump. Otherwise, I have plants that are thriving in this environment. One S. X areolata "Citronelle White Beauty" was an incredibly slow grower, 3 leaves per growing season, no more. On suspicion concerning the pot in tray method it was in, I moved it in fall into the Circulating bog. Come spring, it came "out of the gates" with an incredible rise in growth rate. Instead of 3 leaves for an entire growing season, I got 6 leaves in spring, and 5 in the summer. The rhizome, which for 3 years prior to this, seemed to not grow at all, suddenly got huge, and spread VERY well for the first season in this bog. Soon, the advent of spring will tell me even more about the improvement of its growth rate, and all because the growing environment emulated its own. A healthy bog with water moving through it is a key factor to healthy growth, and I strongly reccommend it to all. Its robustness was also improved through this beneficial move. I cannot answer your questions to the extent you want them answered, I only understand results. And I would not go back to the tray method for ANY reason after the growth rates in this bog tripled. Due to, I believe, the health of the soil base because of fresh air being pulled through it. And I love the quiet dripping of ever moving water as it runs through the growing media and falls into the resorvoir below.
    45 yrs. growin\'
    Founder NASC

  8. #24

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    What type of circulating pump are you using?

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