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Thread: Found new sphagnum bog!!

  1. #17
    Lucky Greenhorn Lil Stinkpot's Avatar
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    I have never heard of quaking bogs. Neat! Are they very common?
    If you shake a rain stick, you get rain. I need a hamata stick.
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  2. #18
    scottychaos's Avatar
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    They are somewhat common around the Great Lakes Region..
    we have several here in Western NY..
    ours have sundews and S. purpurea:

    http://gold.mylargescale.com/scottychaos/CP/page3.html

    around here, the spagnum bogs often exist in "kettles"..which are glacial "craters" left behind from the last ice age..imagine the edge of a glacier, hundreds of feet high..the glacier is slowly retreating..
    big chunks of ice fall off and sit on the ground..as the glacier retreats, tons of dirt and gravel is washed out from underneath, the "iceberg" gets surrounded with dirt and gravel, half-burying it..
    eventually it melts..leaving behind a large "crater" in the earth..thats a kettle.
    we have tons of cool glacial features like that around..also eskers:

    and western NY has (what I believe is) the 2nd largest drumlin field in the world..second only to a larger one in Siberia: http://www.geo.cornell.edu/geology/f...previous-photo


    and I agree..never introduce non-native species!

    Scot

  3. #19
    mass's Avatar
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    So is it possible that the bog I found does actually have some CP's, and they just haven't flowered yet? Because I looked as far as I could and saw squadoosh..

  4. #20
    scottychaos's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by massmorels View Post
    So is it possible that the bog I found does actually have some CP's, and they just haven't flowered yet? Because I looked as far as I could and saw squadoosh..
    possible yes..
    sundews might be hard to spot this time of year, since new growth is just starting, and last years growth will be shriveled and black from the winter..

    but if there are any S. purpurea in the bog, they should be highly visable any time of year..last years pitchers will still be right out there..the rosettes dont die down in the winter at all...some pitchers survivie through the winter, others will be brown and dead but still basically whole..

    So if you didnt see any purps on your visit, odds are good they simply arent there..

    Scot

  5. #21
    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
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    S. purpurea should be easy to spot because of the flowers this time of year. Sundews usually betray themselves with patches of red.

    However it is usual for inexperienced carnivorous plant hunters to trample unknowingly on the very plants they are looking for and not spot anything until they get home and find a crushed plant stuck to the bottom of their shoes.

    Do not under any circumstances introduce any species indigenous or not. You would be changing the natural accession of the biome as well as disturbing the gene pool. The last issue of Carnivorous Plant Newsletter tells of how some one introduced a Sarracenia leucophylla into the middle of a private preserve of one of the few remaining stands of pure S. alata. The plant went unnoticed for several years and now the population is no longer pure.
    Grand Hotel... always the same. People come, people go. Nothing ever happens.

  6. #22
    Learning How To Multiply Indigo's Avatar
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    I see... Oh wow... Good to know this now Or else I be doing something stupid.. Thanks for the Info

  7. #23
    SirKristoff's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Not a Number View Post
    S. purpurea should be easy to spot because of the flowers this time of year. Sundews usually betray themselves with patches of red.

    However it is usual for inexperienced carnivorous plant hunters to trample unknowingly on the very plants they are looking for and not spot anything until they get home and find a crushed plant stuck to the bottom of their shoes.

    Do not under any circumstances introduce any species indigenous or not. You would be changing the natural accession of the biome as well as disturbing the gene pool. The last issue of Carnivorous Plant Newsletter tells of how some one introduced a Sarracenia leucophylla into the middle of a private preserve of one of the few remaining stands of pure S. alata. The plant went unnoticed for several years and now the population is no longer pure.
    yep i read that issue and was pretty saddened by that.....

    i agree with everyone who has said it so far, DO NOT, under ANY circumstances, introduce any plants to that or any habitat....

  8. #24
    billylh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Not a Number View Post
    S. purpurea should be easy to spot because of the flowers this time of year. Sundews usually betray themselves with patches of red.

    However it is usual for inexperienced carnivorous plant hunters to trample unknowingly on the very plants they are looking for and not spot anything until they get home and find a crushed plant stuck to the bottom of their shoes.

    Do not under any circumstances introduce any species indigenous or not. You would be changing the natural accession of the biome as well as disturbing the gene pool. The last issue of Carnivorous Plant Newsletter tells of how some one introduced a Sarracenia leucophylla into the middle of a private preserve of one of the few remaining stands of pure S. alata. The plant went unnoticed for several years and now the population is no longer pure.
    I know the exact one your talking about and have actually witnessed it first hand. Not only is it an obvious problem, but its very hard to find the culprit plants on 20 acres. I know that guy has been trying to remove as many as possible(both the leuco x alata and alata x leuco, since they are different in appearance) every year for the last 3 or 4 years. Best way was to wait for flowers, but alot more are not flowering than are.

    ~billy

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