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Thread: Temperate bog soil

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    Lucky Greenhorn Lil Stinkpot's Avatar
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    Temperate bog soil

    I have quite an infestation of earthworms, so once all my Sarrs go dormant, I'm re-bogging my bog. It's HUGE, let me tell you, @ approximately 100 gallons. Erm, probably plus some.



    While I am at it, I'd like some input on what I should put in the soil. I would like to add more sand this time, more than 60%, if advisable. I also would like to find some things to add in to more closely replicate the soil found under wild Sarracenia and Dionaea. What kind of soil is out there? What's in it? CAN I replicate it? Should I?

    I also need to pay very close attention to the bottom two feet (yes, TWO FEET) of soil. I currently have a simple 50/50 mix of sand & peat down there. Should I change it? To what? I think mostly sand ought to do it. Someone brought up the question about the soil going anoxic. Is that a problem, and how can I prevent it? Would adding lots of lava rock, pumice or perlite help?



    What's in YOUR soil?

    Any and ALL input is welcome, and appreciated!
    If you shake a rain stick, you get rain. I need a hamata stick.
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    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    I think that a top layer of LFS, followed by peat, followed by sand & peat would mimic nature, somewhat. I'm just not sure what thickness of each. Maybe your local USDA or USGS has a profile of soils?

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    Steve Booth's Avatar
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    Hi Lil Stinkpot
    If you are changing the medium I would go for either a 50/50 mix of peat and sand and or perlite, I tend to use perlite as it keeps the mix 'open' and allows air into the roots, but I know a lot of people dont like perlite because of its whiteness. Having said that you could always put a layer of sphagnum or pure peat over it to cover it. otherwise if you can get lots of sphagnum, mix that with sand and peat to give a good useable mix.
    It will be difficult to replicate 'wild' soils in small containers such as this, but Sarrs are found in bogs frequently populated by pine trees, so some pine needles or pine bark may be advantageous, and will keep the acidity high.
    How deep is the container? if its well over sixtteen inches, I would consider putting inverted buckets with holes in, or old plastic pots or other inert things in the bottom, to create a resevoir of water for the medium to absorb when the season gets dry.
    If the medium isn't too old and knackered, you could always seive it to get the worms out and re use it
    either to mix in with the new mix or for potting other plants.
    Have you got and drain holes anywhere in the container? These will help from reducing your mix to a mush.

    Hope this helps
    Cheers
    Steve

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    Lucky Greenhorn Lil Stinkpot's Avatar
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    Would a CA USGS office have the files on East Coast soils? I guess I can go find an office and ask. I was hoping someone here who's been out there would be able to give a few pointers.



    The container is over two feet deep. I can try adding a couple inverted 1gal terra cotta pots. At the very least, they'll save me a couple bags worth of soil.

    There are two drain holes; one at the "high water mark", the highest I'll allow the water to be, and one big threaded drain at the bottom. I won't use that one unless I absolutely must- it's recessed, and very near impossible to get sand out of the threads once it gets in. Right now, it's clean. I can drill another drain a few inches down and cork it during the summer, when it's hard to keep the water IN. Will that help?

    The worms are red wrigglers, and while sifting may remove most of the adults, it won't remove the babies and eggs. The soil that's in there right now is new, mixed last fall, but now contaminated by worms, their eggs and their *ahem* nutrients. The soil is ruined, and it stinks. I will put it in the next batch of compost, and use it to "fluff" up the veggie garden.

    The use of pine needles is attractive, I've been toying with the idea for quite some time. We have lots of pine trees around, getting some needles won't be a problem.
    If you shake a rain stick, you get rain. I need a hamata stick.
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    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
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    You should talk to Ozzy or Phil since they've restored or relocated plants from natural habitat.

    There are plenty of in situ photos of Dionaea growing in Sphagnum moss.
    Grand Hotel... always the same. People come, people go. Nothing ever happens.

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    Tastes like chicken! Exo's Avatar
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    The CP around where I live seem to grow in almost pure sand, the rest of the soil seems to consist of broken down plant matter.


    Keep in mind though, that the bog here doesn't seem to have and sphag in it at all.
    Some days it just isn't worth chewing thru the restraints.

    My growlist: http://www.terraforums.com/forums/sh...255#post961255

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    Lucky Greenhorn Lil Stinkpot's Avatar
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    A little birdie flew in with some secret messages, and gave me a few pointers.
    He has the same tub I have, and suggested I try filling the bottom with a coarse inert media, leaving only the top third filled with a premium mix. I will also try to utilize the drain that comes with the tub, and empty the tub periodically.

    We were up in the hills visiting a friend, and I was able to acquire a huge bag of free pine needles. I'll try chopping some up and adding them to the mix.

    I think I want a 1 to 2 inch top layer of sand to help with rain splattering. It may also help keep the carpet moss away.



    But first I gotta BUY The stuff!
    If you shake a rain stick, you get rain. I need a hamata stick.
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    limeslide's Avatar
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    What's this inert stuff you talk about?

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