User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 9 to 16 of 17

Thread: starting a container bog :D

  1. #9
    101% noob potted_plants's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Southern California (USA)
    Posts
    188
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Outdoors year round, spatulata really suffers here in socal. If it even survives-that is during the winter. If you are really content to set it out, do so in summer. Not winter. Secondly, at least where I am and in most parts of so cal, it is cold enough for plants to go dormant. Sarrs and vfts go dormant without issue..... so, in summary, grow temperate plants outdoors. If you want to grow tropical plants outdoors, sure they will grow.... but do them a favor and spare them of the winter and the blunt of storms. Temperate plants thrive here year round--you might as well just save yourself some trouble and grow them.
    "Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I'm not sure about the universe." ---- Albert Einstein
    Food is a important part of a balanced diet.
    My small grow list

  2. #10
    scottychaos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Western New York, USA
    Posts
    2,970
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    People in Southern California successfully grow Sarrs and VFT's..
    just leave them outside 24/7/365..
    yes, its technically a warmer winter than their native climate, but *some* cooling in the winter, combined with a shorter photoperiod, apparently is enough to give the plants a mild dormancy..
    (im sure some of the Socal people will chime-in and explain what they do)

    For a bog this size (small) you cant easily do an aquatic section..the container simply isnt big enough..
    for a much larger "in the ground" bog, you could dig a section that extends below the water table, so that is has standing water, then have raised peat around it for the non-aquatic CP's, like this:



    but that simply isnt practical in a bog that is only a foot across!
    or even 2 feet across..
    For now, just make this a "regular" bog, and if you want to also grow aquatics, just grow them in a separate container..

    I dont remember the exact size hole I drilled..probably about 1/2"..
    I got some hose/tube fittings at home depot to attach the tubing, they dictated the size of the hole..
    the drain tube isnt strictly necessary..just a "regular" hole is fine..the water can just dribble out..

    I fill my minibogs with pure peat only..then use a top-dressing of LFS (Long Fiber Sphagnum) to keep the rain from splashing the peat around..(peat, by itself, is very fine-grained and "muddy")..I also take a plug of LFS and stick it in the drain hole, so that peat doesnt leak out..

    Scot

  3. #11
    101% noob potted_plants's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Southern California (USA)
    Posts
    188
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by scottychaos View Post
    People in Southern California successfully grow Sarrs and VFT's..
    just leave them outside 24/7/365..
    yes, its technically a warmer winter than their native climate, but *some* cooling in the winter, combined with a shorter photoperiod, apparently is enough to give the plants a mild dormancy..
    (im sure some of the Socal people will chime-in and explain what they do)
    I just simply leave them outside. Doesn't get much more simple then that.
    "Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I'm not sure about the universe." ---- Albert Einstein
    Food is a important part of a balanced diet.
    My small grow list

  4. #12
    Pk93's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    LA county, California
    Posts
    98
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks everybody for all of your responses !!!... Good to hear I can grow some Sarracenia and vfts in the bog; I'll definitely look into obtaining a D. filiformis ..however are there any cps that will stay evergreen during socal winters?
    Im also thinking about adding some bog or marsh orchids if the temps here fit
    Thanks Again!!!

  5. #13
    101% noob potted_plants's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Southern California (USA)
    Posts
    188
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Pk93 View Post
    Thanks everybody for all of your responses !!!... Good to hear I can grow some Sarracenia and vfts in the bog; I'll definitely look into obtaining a D. filiformis ..however are there any cps that will stay evergreen during socal winters?
    Im also thinking about adding some bog or marsh orchids if the temps here fit
    Thanks Again!!!
    As we don't get snow, sarrs keep their pitchers when they go dormant--you can barely tell. Until the end of the season, when the brown and die. You could always keep tropicals then just bring them inside during the winter.
    "Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I'm not sure about the universe." ---- Albert Einstein
    Food is a important part of a balanced diet.
    My small grow list

  6. #14
    Pk93's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    LA county, California
    Posts
    98
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    ooh, nice to hear that sarrs keep their pitchers during dormancy. thanks again

  7. #15
    Pk93's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    LA county, California
    Posts
    98
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hey there again!; Just put in my Vft, and D. spatulata (just going to take it out when it starts to cool down here).
    Just wondering whether or not there are any Utricularia that would be able to stay in the bog all year round in socal? Oh, and would a Darlingtonia (mountain variety) be able to handle SoCal summers?
    thank You

  8. #16
    Oh, the humanity!! TheFury's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Brooklyn, NY
    Posts
    779
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I can't directly answer your question because I'm not too familiar with either of those species, but if U. longifolia can handle those conditions I've got some I can send you. It's not doing much for me; doesn't like me enough to flower.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •