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Thread: My 44 pentagon thread

  1. #9

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    Update: It turned out the "webs" from spider mites were just drops of dew sticking to the ground. Whew!
    Anyway, some new pics. The Adelae has exploded in growth and the others are just picking up after the addition of the led. I might add a CFL to supplement the spectrum.

    FTS:


    Bicalcarata:


    Binata T-form:


    Cephalotus:


    Capensis:


    Carbarup:


    Madagascariensis:


    And finally, the adelae, before:


    After:

  2. #10

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    love that terrarium and also love the job/presentation you have done with it. I hope to get a setup like that one day but first i need a collection; otherwise I would be in it all the time swapping things out. lol.

  3. #11
    Safety Shears's Avatar
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    cool terrarium, nifty shape. The Cephalotus may need to be moved to a drier environment though, they are prone to root rot in soggy conditions. I don't own a ceph though, so I'd get a second opinion.

  4. #12
    i dont do pots. amphirion's Avatar
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    like corals, certain CPs have certain preferences that will allow them to persist in the long term. for example, you did well in placing your first nepenthes on higher ground, as these plants in general appreciate loose, airy soil--most nep growers will advocate long fibered sphagnum (LFS), perlite/pumice, and orchid bark with a dash of peat. Lowlander neps such as your bicalcarata (bical) can take more peat in their mix, but still will appreciate good drainage. The heliamphora, and cephalotus likewise will appreciate higher elevation for drainage in their tank. Do keep in mind that heliamphora come from highland locations, on average of ~1750 m above sea level, where as bical comes from ~300 m above sea level. Not saying it will be impossible to raise these together, as i've seen a N. hamata growing alongside a bical before, as well as seen petiolaris sundews grow alongside heliamphora. at least you didnt put in North American CPs--not impossible, but it does complicate things when approaching winter.

    Aside from the bug issues, everything seems to be looking good. looking forward to seeing your progress.
    " You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means." -Inigo Montoya
    +growlist
    +petiolaris drosera going dormant?
    +picture thread

  5. #13

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    Ehhh, did you read the second half? The heli wasn't doing good, so I moved it outside during one night in the summer. Normally, it gets down to 60* in CA where I live, but apparently the heli decided to freeze, brown, and die after the first night outside. What a waste.
    And the highland nepenthes has been moved to its own windowsill. The ceph has been placed on the side of the mig hill, near to the glass. The bical is planted in a pot that has been cleverly hidden beneath the coat of spaghum, with its own nepenthes media. Nex I'm going to repot the ceph if it does badly.

    And what was though to be mites was actually just the dew from the sundew mixing with condensation and running off the plant, forming a web-like thing. Definitely no mites.

  6. #14
    Safety Shears's Avatar
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    If the ceph shows any sign of decline i'd recommend immediately repotting it. Google "sudden cephalotus death syndrome" for horror stories.

  7. #15

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    The death is anything but sudden. And I just repotted it into a higher area with retention of water.

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