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Thread: Not enough light?

  1. #9
    Formerly known as Pineapple Nepenthesis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by asid61 View Post
    Maybe it's the humidity. I'll get a small fountain, then work on the lights to see.
    I am laso making a red+blue led panel to get some more spectrums in.
    A small fogger would probably be more effective and less costly. Those terrarium waterfalls are like $40... It's crazy.

  2. #10

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    I have about 4" of water/clay balls in the bottom with a heater that keeps the tank 85F when lights on and drops to 67F over night

  3. #11

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    I hooked up a fogger. But it puts out so much fog that my sundews have dew from the fog on them (not regularly formed by them). And still the humidity is running at 67% on a good day, 59% on a bad day. My bical is showing signs of humidity stress.

    And it's a little late to put hydroton in the bottom.

  4. #12

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    Well I went ahead and order some lights to DIY. Some leds from steve's and a big heatsink and some hips to make a driver with. Just over $60 and about 27w of led.

  5. #13
    mobile's Avatar
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    The advantage of LEDs is that you can choose the wavelengths most suited to photosynthesis (red and blue); however, this advantage is somewhat negated when using white LEDs, which use phosphors to convert colours in much the same way as fluorescent lamps do. If colours are in the bands that plants can't make much use of, such as greens for instance, then they are not of much use. White LEDs and fluorescent tubes will have several spectral peaks and one of these will be in the green band, so will look bright to the human eye which is most sensitive to green but reflected by many plants.

    I always choose LEDs with wavelengths in the main chlorophyll absorption bands and add a few supplementary white LEDs so the plants look good to human eyes.
    Last edited by mobile; 12-13-2012 at 11:33 AM.

  6. #14

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    I got a star with 3 deep red (660nm), a star with 3 royal blue (455nm), and a star with one 2700k white one turquoise and one cool blue (470nm). These are going in addition to the big white led panel.

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