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Thread: Its time to build a Cephalotus grow space, would love input!

  1. #17

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    I'm amazed at how much of the information out there is for growing one very specific plant and its not a Ceph!
    Funny you should mention that. Seems I learned a lot more about what kind of artificial lighting to use for CPs in "those" forums than I ever did anywhere else. Found the info doing my usual google research about the plant lighting subject in general, as I have never grown that "other plant" before. But I totally know what you mean...

  2. #18

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    I think I have a general game plan for the lighting. Since I'm using the solderless LEDs swapping one or two out if I don't like the results is not that big of a deal. I figured I would try 2 different mixes and see what worked best.

    From looking at all the wavelength graphs, I can see a benefit from each of the "white" LEDs so I figured a mix of them would be good also.

    All the white LEDs are 1500mA max with the Royal Blue @ 1000mA max and the Deep Red @750mA max. Would make wiring more interesting and I might need 3 drivers instead of 2.

    WW Warm white, NW neutral white, CW Cool White, RB Royal Blue, DR Deep Red

    Layout for one of the shelves.

    WW NW RB NW DR NW CW

    CW NW DR NW RB NW WW

    And the other.

    WW DR RB NW DR RB CW

    CW RB DR NW RB DR WW

    http://www.rapidled.com/solderless-c...arm-white-led/
    Warm White - 2,600-3,700K Color Temperature

    http://www.rapidled.com/solderless-c...l-white-led-1/
    Neutral White - 3,700-5,000K Color Temperature

    http://www.rapidled.com/solderless-c...l-white-led-1/
    Cool White - 5,000-8,300K Color Temperature

    http://www.rapidled.com/solderless-p...oyal-blue-led/
    Royal Blue - 440-460nm dominant/peak wavelength (typical: 447.5nm)

    http://www.rapidled.com/solderless-p...-deep-red-led/
    Deep Red - 650-670nm dominant/peak wavelength

    See aren't LEDs FUN!

    Would love some input from someone with LED experience.

  3. #19
    mobile's Avatar
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    I get good colouration using the traditional 4:1 red:blue mix with a few whites thrown in.

  4. #20
    jimmy uphwiz's Avatar
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    killer thread guys. ill use this again and again when i give these led things a try . ill have to read through again , as im a little confused, i do have some skills with soldering , high school electronics , but it looks like that isnt going to be necessary , lol.
    a pic or two as you get them mounted, and glowing would be greatly appreciated.

  5. #21

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    I ended up ordering just neutral white, cool white, and warm white LEDs. I could not figure out a configuration I was happy with using only 2 drivers and the 750mA/1000mA/1500mA LEDs. So I went with all 1500mAs. When I'm done if I think I need more red/blue I have a plan! I can order a http://www.rapidled.com/4-led-solderless-moonlight-kit/ and just run it without a dimmer with the blues/reds. Worst case when I wire the bottom two shelves I'll have the proper number of drivers to configure everything with dimmers if I want to. Although it would be a wiring nightmare.

    Anyway I received all the LED pieces today!

    First up on the project list is putting together the dimmer. With luck I'm start on that tomorrow, its the only part of this I will have to solder.

    DSC_0749 by randallsimpson, on Flickr

    And the rest of the LEDs pieces.

    DSC_0750 by randallsimpson, on Flickr

  6. #22
    jimmy uphwiz's Avatar
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    im watching thanks again for keeping this going.

  7. #23
    mobile's Avatar
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    You will probably be ok with all whites, especially as you have several types - just won't be as energy efficient as plant specific wavelengths as there will be a fair bit of wasted greens. If you decide to add later then you won't need blues, as they will be well covered in the whites, you'll just need reds.

  8. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by mobile View Post
    You will probably be ok with all whites, especially as you have several types - just won't be as energy efficient as plant specific wavelengths as there will be a fair bit of wasted greens. If you decide to add later then you won't need blues, as they will be well covered in the whites, you'll just need reds.
    Just adding the reds would work out really well actually, 4 reds per shelf would be about perfect.

    I'm not going to get into any of the skills required to solder as this would not be a good beginner project imo, if you have done a few things in the past it would be a challenge but very doable. Although, since this is not a space shuttle and is not likely to take off at high speeds, vibrating like mad, the need for high reliability soldering is really low. Gotta love soldering training video's! This is just a dimming unit and there are a lot of prebuilt units out there if you are soldering challenged.

    First up is to gather all your supplies, take note of the large coffee cup in the back as its the most needed component this early in the morning. I have replaced 4 of the supplied wires with longer red/black wires for easier connection later on.

    DSC_0751 by randallsimpson, on Flickr

    Tinning your wires and terminals is very helpful, if you don't know what tinning is you may want to buy a pre-built unit or practice some.

    DSC_0752 by randallsimpson, on Flickr

    I connected all the "inner" wires together first before connected the "outer" wires for one main reason, I did not want to mess with longer wires hanging all around my work space until I needed too.

    DSC_0753 by randallsimpson, on Flickr

    And the completed unit, I tested 3 setting (0%, 50%, 100%) with an ohm meter on both channels to ensure everything was working ok. This was the hardest part of this entire build, everything is downhill from here. It took me about 1hr 15m from start to finishing cleanup. I have many years with soldering but I'm getting old and my hands are not as steady as they used to be, really slowed me down some.

    DSC_0754 by randallsimpson, on Flickr

    Got the heatsinks last night also. Next on my list is to drill holes for the hanging mounts into the aluminum. For anyone who has never worked with CREE LED or the like, this looks like a lot of metal for such tiny little circuits but its not. I will not be running these at full power for two reasons, LEDs are "supposed" to last significantly longer if ran at cooler temperatures and if I ran 7 of these LEDs per heatsink at full power the heatsinks would be too hot to touch. Yes 7 of those little circuits can and will heat that giant bar of metal hot enough to burn your hand in under an hour if you run them at 100%. Off to drilling!

    DSC_0755 by randallsimpson, on Flickr

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