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Thread: CP Vivarium

  1. #17

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    For the tons of light if i put it in front of an open window that gets light most of the morning and most of the day would it be okay? or would more light be needed. Me being in Illinois, the winters are cold and in spring a rain storm happens most days. Would this be good for them?

    Also can anyone please tell me what soil and water they use? I have heard many people saying they use different kinds and want to know what is the best. Also how often do CP need to be replanted? Thanks for all the help again

  2. #18
    I hate bugs. Carnivorous plants get me. jpappy789's Avatar
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    Depends on what plants exactly you're talking about...

    A lot of easy growing sundews and pings can do fine in a south facing windowsill. Most soils people use are peat based, but mix in sand or perlite to aid in drainage (usually 50/50) which what you may see called a "standard CP mix." Granted, not every CP will do well with that mixture.

    Water is definitely important...most say cutoff of 100 ppm TDS or less but lower is generally better. Unless your tap is already like that, you would be best off trying to find a reliable source of RO(/DI) water. A lot of grocery and convenience stores sell water filtered as "drinking water" that works, but check the labels to see how its filtered and if any minerals are added back. Some of the same places have dispensers that just charge for however much you fill up. Another place to look would be any aquarium store that sells marine fish/corals as they usually also sell RO/DI water. I would recommend investing in a TDS meter at some point (about $20 or so on Amazon) because I've been burned with purchasing bad water in the past.

    Replanting depends on growth rate, pot size, etc. There's no way to give an accurate number without considering a bunch of factors.
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  3. #19
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    Exactly what jpappy said - 50/50 peat:sand or 50/50 peat : perlite will work for most easy growing plants - but there will be a few exceptions. Pings will grow in peat mixes just fine, but occasionally they will rapidly rot out from the center in such mixes. Growing them in entirely inorganic mixes based on vermiculite, pumice, and/or APS (Schultz Aquatic Plant soil) can help prevent this. (There's a lot of variety when it comes to Mexican Pinguicula mixes, even incorporating improbable materials like lava rocks and iron oxide powder). Nepenthes generally like more well draining mixes as well, something like 50/50 long fiber sphagnum moss : perlite. D. binata and D. spatulata will definitely do fine in 50/50 peat : perlite or 50/50 peat : sand.

    Just as a clarification, RO stands for reverse-osmosis and DI stands for deionized (or distilled). These types of water have had minerals and other dissolved solids removed so they are safe for CPs. You can usually find distilled water in 1-gallon jugs at stores as jpappy mentioned - just make sure that nothing is added to it. Regular "drinking water" is not ok unless it specifically is distilled or reverse-osmosis with no added minerals. Rainwater is safe, but can be a hassle to collect and store.

    As much light as possible is really best for most CPs. You can always try putting them in the windowsill, and move them if they show signs of light deprivation. It takes a while for low light to kill plants, and usually just makes them unhealthy and sickly.

    Cold winters below freezing will kill D. spatulata, make temperate forms of D. binata go dormant, and cause tropical forms of D. binata to die back. Unless the roots completely freeze though, I suspect D. spatulata would resprout after a while.

    Finally, repotting depends on the plant as jpappy mentioned. D. spatulata and D. binata you can probably repot every year because they grow like weeds and will soon crowd the pot. Neither of them is particularly sensitive so I wouldn't hesitate repotting if the soil is getting old or if they are outgrowing their containers.
    Last edited by w03; 03-17-2015 at 07:26 PM.
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  4. #20
    I hate bugs. Carnivorous plants get me. jpappy789's Avatar
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    Sorry, should have clarified that the "drinking water" I was referring to distinctly has "purified by reverse osmosis filtration" (or something to that effect) on the label.
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  5. #21

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    Thank you everyone for all the help! Just to make sure i have it all clear. I get a planting pot with peat and perlite. I do a 50/50 mix with these and put the plant inside near a lot of light. I water the plant whenever the soil gets a little dry (i would guess every other day ish?) and that should be good for set up am i correct?

    Then since these are CP do you need to feed them or do they not NEED it? If so whats a good food for sundews? Thanks again

  6. #22
    I hate bugs. Carnivorous plants get me. jpappy789's Avatar
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    They don't need to be fed, but some people like the benefit of regular feeding. I personally don't put that much effort into my dews

    As for watering, I almost exclusively grow by the "tray method" which is simply keeping your pots in a tray of standing water. Reduces any need to directly water and most of the easy growing species are fine being that consistently wet.
    Last edited by jpappy789; 03-18-2015 at 09:49 PM.
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  7. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nick_27 View Post
    For the tons of light if i put it in front of an open window that gets light most of the morning and most of the day would it be okay? or would more light be needed. Me being in Illinois, the winters are cold and in spring a rain storm happens most days. Would this be good for them?

    Also can anyone please tell me what soil and water they use? I have heard many people saying they use different kinds and want to know what is the best. Also how often do CP need to be replanted? Thanks for all the help again
    Hi Nick, just be careful when putting a terrarium in direct Sun light as the temperatures tends to shoot up quite rapidly. If you do put it in the sun make sure you can control the heat with fan's etc.

    Here are some photos of my mini terrarium. It's not much but the plants grow quite well in it


    Last edited by Brolloks; 03-19-2015 at 10:05 AM.

  8. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nick_27 View Post
    Thank you everyone for all the help! Just to make sure i have it all clear. I get a planting pot with peat and perlite. I do a 50/50 mix with these and put the plant inside near a lot of light. I water the plant whenever the soil gets a little dry (i would guess every other day ish?) and that should be good for set up am i correct?

    Then since these are CP do you need to feed them or do they not NEED it? If so whats a good food for sundews? Thanks again
    A good tip that I have picked from the forums and a lot of the websites is to rinse your peat with RO/Distilled/purified water. This removes a lot of minerals and other unwanted stuff from the peat. I use a TDS meter to check my water after every rinse (I leave my peat to soak for about 20+hours depending how busy I am) and usually rinse my peat for about 4-7 days depending on the quality of the peat itself. You don't have to go crazy like that but rinsing will definitely benefit your plants in the long run.

    A lot of the plants can stand in a tray of water permanently, but that also depends on your growing conditions, Pot size, plant health etc. What you can do is add water to the tray that they are standing in and let the tray dry out before adding again. You will learn over time what your plants like and don't like.
    Last edited by Brolloks; 03-19-2015 at 10:21 AM.

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