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Thread: Are there pots with clear, removable lids to grow plants in?

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    rakovsky's Avatar
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    Question Are there pots with clear, removable lids to grow plants in?

    I would like to have a pot with a sealed bottom to grow my sundews in. It would be great for two reasons:
    First, with a sealed bottom, it is cleaner, and with no tray of water separating the pot from the floor, insects can crawl into the pot. I don't have a problem regularly keeping pots well watered enough for the peat moss to be moist for the Sundews, and have years of practice at it. I think it would be neat to have sundews that could catch normal insects in my house. Drosophyllum leaves were torn off and used by the Portuguese as flypaper in their homes, for example. I would not tear the leaves off, but just have the plants in a pot where the insects could get to them.
    Secondly, as a pot with no sides above ground, the insects could easily fly to the sundews. It would also look neat as a "house plant."

    To give you an example of what I mean by a "pot" without above-ground walls that doesn't need to be in a tray, see the pot on the left:


    At the same time, I would like to be able to cap the pot with a clear lid. This is because for much of the time I would be away, and having a clear container fully enclosed around a carnivorous plant is a good way to keep its humidity right and also to keep the moisture inside in cases where I would be there to water it. I have had excellent experience for years growing carnivorous plants in enclosed jars as such:



    With the clear lid on the jar and with the clear walls, the plants get plenty of sunlight in my well lit room, and they don't dry out either because the moisture remains enclosed.

    Is there a kind of pot that encompasses both these properties: A pot with a solid bottom whose above-ground walls and lid can be removed for weeks at a time and then put back onto the pot such that it encloses the pot fully?

    The reason why a regular pot doesn't match the criteria is that it lacks a removable top and walls, and the reason why a regular big jar doesn't qualify is that the above-ground wall encircling the jar is not removable.

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    Well if it's for sundews, the first problem is that sundews don't really catch crawling insects, generally only flying ones

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    I was searching for a punch bowl with a lid or a cake stand holder thing with the lid but couldn't find a clear one.. So if u can find one that would prob be a good way to accomplish what your trying to do

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    BS Bulldozer SubRosa's Avatar
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    A glass/crystal sugar bowl would fit your parameters, but not if it's the civilized type notched for a dedicated sugar spoon.
    Judge not lest ye be judged creates a cesspool. Judge others and prepare to be judged by them.
    Just know when to keep the verdict to yourself.

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    Swagalotus's Avatar
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    Why not just use jars? Another alternative would be to just place a ziplic baggie or saran wrap over a pot. Would that work?

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    They sell old-style lanterns at a local crafts store where I live. A bit of weather stripping around the door, and you've got a fairly well sealed container that you can put a small pot in, and close the door.

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    rakovsky's Avatar
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    This looks good, except that not only does it look cheap, but if you use venus fly traps, it is hard to get them to grow with the lid totally off in 45% humidity (although some growers have been successful with this through acclimatization.). The Venus Flytraps need lots of humidity, whereas my goal is to have a plant that does not need a lid on it or much humidity. That is why I intend to use Drosera Capensis or a similar sundew.

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    w03's Avatar
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    It's a myth that VFT's only grow in high humidity. Acclimatization shouldn't be particularly difficult, just change your conditions slowly- or buy a plant that's already hardened off.

    Back home in San Diego there's tons of people that grow amazing flytraps outside year round with no problems even though we can get temperatures above 95F and humidity that drops below 25%.
    Last edited by w03; 10-30-2015 at 10:41 AM.
    "Potential has a shelf life." -Margaret Atwood
    My meager growlist

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