User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  1
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 8 of 22

Thread: Specimen Terrarium

  1. #1

    Join Date
    May 2015
    Posts
    4
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Specimen Terrarium

    Hi all,
    I am an experienced dart frog keeper who is somewhat new to CPs. I had a magnificent N. purpurea in a big glass vase for a while, but it eventually outgrew it, got cramped and failed to thrive.

    I have this wonderful 27 gallon cube sitting empty in my living room. I don't want to set up another dart tank, and would love to make a nice specimen tank for a pitcher. My hope is to plant the pitcher off the ground in a hollow log leaving room for the cups to trail down. I would include some smaller plants to accentuate the tank, but the pitcher would be the centerpiece.

    If I could get some species opinions I'd appreciate it. Once I have some species names I'll research them and make sure my conditions would be appropriate.

    I tried too post a picture of the tank, but apparently don't have permission to attach an image.
    Last edited by Smashtoad; 11-09-2015 at 09:35 PM.

  2. #2
    WolframOmega's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    California
    Posts
    57
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    It's S. purpurea for Sarrencenia purpurea.
    Sarracenia, the north american pitcher plants, are temperate and do best outside in full sun year-round; they probably shouldn't be cloistered in a tank.
    If you are looking for terrarium plants, I suggest highland or lowland nepenthes; they can be very impressive, highlands in particular. Species like N. jamban, hamata, macrophylla, edwardsiana, robcantleyi come to mind, but remember that some of the most beautiful species are also the most difficult to keep alive. Heliamphora and Cephalotus are also very nice. I suggest doing lots of research and starting with easy species moving up. The dart frog knowledge will help.
    But are you sure you only want a single specimen in the tank? I assure you, once you get into this hobby, you won't be able to resist getting a million. A big terrarium dedicated to carnivorous plants and filled to the brim with as many plants as possible is what most of us end up with.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Also, use an image hosting website and paste the direct link for attaching photos.
    Last edited by WolframOmega; 11-09-2015 at 10:26 PM.

  3. #3

    Join Date
    May 2015
    Posts
    4
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks for the tips. The tank is 18 x 18 x 20H.

    I looked into those species a little...fell in love with jamban. We'll see. Here's a pic of the tank. I've used hosting sites, they're just such a PITA.


  4. #4
    w03's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Nashville, TN
    Posts
    526
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Just as a note, N. jamban is a highlander, so your night temps need to drop to about mid 50s or so for long term health.
    "Potential has a shelf life." -Margaret Atwood
    My meager growlist

  5. #5

    Join Date
    May 2015
    Posts
    4
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by w03 View Post
    Just as a note, N. jamban is a highlander, so your night temps need to drop to about mid 50s or so for long term health.
    Figures...can't pull that off. Thanks.

    I really dig the short, fat cups. What about ampullaria, or some hybrid of it? Something prone to terrestrial cupping would be great.
    Last edited by Smashtoad; 11-10-2015 at 08:14 AM.

  6. #6
    Plant Whisperer Bio's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    SC
    Posts
    503
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    N. robcantleyi is a rather easy highlander in my experience. If you are unable to provide highland conditions, (at most 65 at night, ideally lower than 60) then there are many stunning intermediate Nepenthes that would be quite easy to grow in there. As long as you are able to provide enough light, species like N. sanguinea, N. ventricosa, and possibly N. truncata should do well without any heating or cooling requirements.

    N. ampullaria and N. bicalcarata are relatively easy lowlanders, but will get enormous in a relatively short period of time.

  7. #7

    Join Date
    May 2015
    Posts
    4
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Here's a rough diagram of what I'm envisioning...sharply angled substrate with the plant trailing down to the front.

    Last edited by Smashtoad; 11-10-2015 at 08:41 AM.

  8. #8
    Plant Whisperer Bio's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    SC
    Posts
    503
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I think N. campanulata is the closest to what you're thinking of, but it's hard to find, and equally hard to grow well.

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •