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Thread: Opinions on Standing Water for Droseras

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    summit's Avatar
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    Opinions on Standing Water for Droseras

    Hello,

    I recently got back into the hobby after I saw this thread and instantly wanted to create something similar. The only real question that I have is, is it okay to keep the whole tank submerged in about 1-2" of water without any movement for the water. I mostly want to make it a Drosera tank and have Capensis and other South African species flourish in it. I've read countless threads on all types of forums saying you need false bottoms and must change the water monthly but after reading the thread above it seems like everything took well to the standing water. Or would it be a better option to have everything in separate trays just on a shelf?

    Thanks,
    Justin

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    Enthusiastic Enthusiast Zath's Avatar
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    The only issue I can see with planted tanks is the difficulty in removing / changing water (if needed). Otherwise, standing water (even stagnant) is perfectly fine for most tropical / subtropical 'dews. If you can discipline your watering sufficiently, a planted tank can work. Otherwise, use the tray method. That's my $.02, at least.

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    Depending upon the size of the tank, it might be worthwhile to consider drilling it for drainage or having it done. If the tank is easy for you to pick up and dump, do it. But on a larger tank a well placed hole with a bulkhead fitting, plumbing to drain excess water to a convenient location, and perhaps a valve will make your growing much more enjoyable. Drilling glass is tedious but really not that difficult, and any glass shop and many better aquarium stores can drill a hole as long as the glass isn't tempered. Which might be something to consider if you haven't gotten your tank yet.
    Judge not lest ye be judged creates a cesspool. Judge others and prepare to be judged by them.
    Just know when to keep the verdict to yourself.

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    I decided to go with the tan, mostly because I already purchased it and have already done shelf keeping but never a terrarium. I got it all planted up today with the three plants I have as of now. (D. Spatulata, D. Capensis Red Leaf, and Pinguicula Aphrodite) To keep the Ping out of standing water I stacked a few river stones in a corner and filled the lower area of the stones with perlite to help drainage and then the top layer with silica sand, if I can find a nice piece of pumice rock I'd rather have it planted into that then the ground. Everything else is 50/50 peat and perlite with about a inch of standing water. As for lighting I'm testing out some compact fluorescent bulbs, if it doesn't suffice then I will be moving to a t5 strip. As for now they're being hit with a 5000k 40w 2600 lumen bulb that's about 6 inches from the plants. I've never really understood indoor lighting for these plants so this might take a little to get down. As for what I want for the tank is to be a sundew paradise and have them carpet the tank and moss on the wood with the Aphrodite tucked in the corner. I do have a question of what moss would you recommend for this enclosure? I know sphagnum is the go to for CP growers but my only concern is that I have no open standing water for the moss and I'm concerned about it overtaking the dews and chocking them out, especially gemmae. And as for the last question what are some other dews I can house? I plan on adding the other varieties of Capensis.

    Thanks,
    Justin







    Last edited by summit; 01-09-2016 at 04:27 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Zath View Post
    The only issue I can see with planted tanks is the difficulty in removing / changing water (if needed). Otherwise, standing water (even stagnant) is perfectly fine for most tropical / subtropical 'dews. If you can discipline your watering sufficiently, a planted tank can work. Otherwise, use the tray method. That's my $.02, at least.
    You can always pull back the substrate with a styrene sheet and add stones all the way down to the bottom. Which ever size you choose, is best. Then it's easier to push an acrylic airline tube connected to airline hose to syphon out the water.

    Looks better when plants aren't growing up the side of the tank.

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    Quote Originally Posted by webskipper View Post
    You can always pull back the substrate with a styrene sheet and add stones all the way down to the bottom. Which ever size you choose, is best. Then it's easier to push an acrylic airline tube connected to airline hose to syphon out the water.

    Looks better when plants aren't growing up the side of the tank.
    Hopefully by the time I need to completely clean out the water in the tank I'll have another want or need to change the whole idea of the tank around, or if it all goes downhill...

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    Enthusiastic Enthusiast Zath's Avatar
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    (Another $.02...let's just call it a nickel)

    A 40-watt equivalent CFL isn't going to be enough. I wouldn't try this without at least a 100-watt equivalent, 150 if I could get it in the same color temp (5000 should be fine).

    The soil also looks too wet for the ping, despite the considerations you've made for it. It looks like you've only got about 3" of soil in the tank as is, but the ping should ideally be mounded up even further if you're keeping a full inch of water-table. Just having that much peat on the surface is going to bring a ton of water to it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Zath View Post
    (Another $.02...let's just call it a nickel)

    A 40-watt equivalent CFL isn't going to be enough. I wouldn't try this without at least a 100-watt equivalent, 150 if I could get it in the same color temp (5000 should be fine).

    The soil also looks too wet for the ping, despite the considerations you've made for it. It looks like you've only got about 3" of soil in the tank as is, but the ping should ideally be mounded up even further if you're keeping a full inch of water-table. Just having that much peat on the surface is going to bring a ton of water to it.
    The packaging for the cfl says it's equivalent to a 150w incandescent bulb... Does this mean I need a 150w cfl? As for the Ping with your comment I'll definitely make it a priority to find that pumice rock and get it out of the peat ASAP.

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