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Thread: Burning in-ground bogs

  1. #9
    Somewhat Unstable superimposedhope's Avatar
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    Pyro, are you as your name sugests? [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_n_32.gif[/img]

    Joe
    \"There is nothing here of interest to any nation, as a matter of fact there is nothing here but humans!\"

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    I'll bet! By the way, what is the ABG?

    Thanks,
    Craig

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    The Atlanta Botanical Garden. Also known as Heaven on Earth.
    Newnan (Atlanta), GA
    - what do you do when your bog is full? you build another. and another. and another. then you buy some pots. and some more. and some more. and some more. then you wonder how much it would cost to rework the hydrology in your yard to place your house on an island. -

  4. #12

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    I burn my bogs as I learned from Mrs. Wilkerson in FL. who has burned off her front yard every winter for 60 years. (her Daddy did it before her) The bogs there are burned two days after a rain in mid to late Feb. The flower buds are not up and the weather is still cool. Two days after a rain means it is dry but not to dry as to get out of hand. ALWAYS have a hose ready! Plastic tags melt very easily (DUH) and I am not sure that zinic or copper will hold up much better. I do keeep the fire away from the liner. Sometimes I dust the bog with a light layer of pine straw to keep the fire moving along. Usually by then I have removed all the old pitchers and they get burned seperatly and the ash adding back to the bog. I water the bog when I am done, one to make sure the fire is out and two to settle the ash in the soil.
    I remain a man obsessed with a genus
    Brooks

  5. #13
    Nepenthes Specialist nepenthes gracilis's Avatar
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    This does no harm to the growth points either?? I'd be nervous to try it upon a bog of S. oreophila or flava...the growing points are right above the soil line!

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    Brooks -

    Thank you very much for the information. If it works for Mrs. Wilkerson, it works for me! The plants on her land (from your pictures) are truly amazing.

    Nep G -

    In the wild, Sarracenia are dependant on fires for their long-term success.

    With water in the bog, temperatures would be kept lower. In addition, the most heat is near the top of the fire, not at ground level as you might expect.

    Fire may do some damage, but I wouldn't expect it.

    - Patrick
    Newnan (Atlanta), GA
    - what do you do when your bog is full? you build another. and another. and another. then you buy some pots. and some more. and some more. and some more. then you wonder how much it would cost to rework the hydrology in your yard to place your house on an island. -

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    In cultivation, we tend to plant our plants too high. In the field, the points are below the soil surface. Patrick in correct in that a low burning fire is best where the hottest part of the fire is well above the growth points. If you keep a tiddy bog without grasses and other associacted plants, then a LIGHT layer of pine starw is helpful to keep the fire moving across the bog. Many of my points are well above the grond and I have not seen adverse effects. A fire like this is way too hot. I am burning the old pitchers seperatly and put the ash back on the bog.

    I remain a man obsessed with a genus
    Brooks

  8. #16
    N=R* fs fp ne fl fi fc L Pyro's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (superimposedhope @ July 13 2004,3:03)]Pyro, are you as your name sugests? [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_n_32.gif[/img]

    Joe
    Joe,

    In my younger days yes I was. I still am a bit of a fire bug but experience has taught me that while fire can be fun it is also a very serious business. I don't "play" with fire anymore but I do always carry a lighter because you never know when you might need to start a fire. My name here is just a carry over of my old river rafting nickname (LOOOOOOOOOOOOOOONG story)
    'My love was science- specifically biology and, more specifically, when placed in a common jar, which of two organisms would devour the other.'

    See You Space Cowboy

    actagggcagtgatatcccattggtacatggcaaattagcctcatgat
    Hagerstown, Maryland

    --
    actagggcagtgatatcccattggtacatggcaaattagcctcatgat

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