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Thread: Bog garden

  1. #9

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    Thanks for the great idea's. I will go a little deeper. Most of the local CP bogs that are easily accessable seem to be on a slope so I'll probably do that also. I don't have much luck with anything other than Sarracenia's and Dionaea's, however I will give other CP's a try. Any more ideas?[img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/confused.gif[/img]

  2. #10

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    I agree with ptfreelander in that the bog soil needs to be much deeper. I have sarracenia seedlings with roots 6" to 8" long/deep. I can only imagine how deep the roots of a full grown sarr will go. It will also help in times of drought. If there were a way to pump water from the pond to the top of a near by slope(as in sloping down to the pond) water could move through the soil very much like in a seepage bog.
    I remain a man obsessed with a genus
    Brooks

  3. #11

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    If the native soil is sand or clay, you don't really need to worry about much added substrate. The S. alata populations I've seen on the Gulf Coast were growing in very heavy clay with a bit of sand and with almost no organic matter (peat).

    On the other hand, the plants may grow more happily in a lighter mix. My point is, they can grow perfectly well in media other than peat.
    Newnan (Atlanta), GA
    - what do you do when your bog is full? you build another. and another. and another. then you buy some pots. and some more. and some more. and some more. then you wonder how much it would cost to rework the hydrology in your yard to place your house on an island. -

  4. #12

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    I was wondering about the pond water, but I thought that there might be too many nutrients in the water (the pond is stocked with fish). Any thoughts

  5. #13

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    In my experience, the nutrients in water due to fish are good for the plants. I've grown Sarracenia in pots half in a small pond over-stocked with comets, and they grew amazingly well, with non of the fertilizer complaints (burning leaves, withered growth, etc).

    I think you have to watch out for chemicals added to water, rather than naturally occuring ones. I'd have no reservation running pond water into a bog unless chemicals are washing into the pond.
    Newnan (Atlanta), GA
    - what do you do when your bog is full? you build another. and another. and another. then you buy some pots. and some more. and some more. and some more. then you wonder how much it would cost to rework the hydrology in your yard to place your house on an island. -

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