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Thread: "little shop of horrors" cp suggestions needed

  1. #9
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    Spring is a great time to have things going! You can have a full growing season and sufficient acclimation before dealing with the next dormancy period. Aside from what we have mentioned, a great book to peruse through and glean quick growing information is one called Savage Garden, by Peter D'Amato. Another great book is one by Don Schnell. I believe the title is: Carnivorous Plants of North America.

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    LauraZ5, Ill come right to the point:

    The Kids Love VFTs.

    It's really as simple as that. Plant lots of flytraps and the kids will be spellbound.

    Plant the other ones too, don't get me wrong. But if you want to get the kids attention, it's all venus flytraps.

    Capslock
    Malo Periculosam Libertatem Quam Quietum Servitium

    My photos are copyright-free and public domain

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    Welcome to the forums Laura! I`d say Dino covered it well. But you could also get some hybrid sarrs with cold hardy parents like S.jonesii,S.purpurea ssp.purpurea,S.oreophilla. Also temperate forms of D.intermedia would do well.
    S.oreophilla and S.jonesii are very hard to aquire (legally) as they must be given to you free of charge for them to be legal as they are on cites apendix#1. I do also agree with Caps. Plant flytraps! I`d recomend: "green dragon",'akai ryu',"blood red traps",'dentate traps','red pirahna',and of course the typical vfts Id use the typicals as fillers and the others as focal point type things.
    [img]http://home.**********.com/users/pondboy/Neps/Neps%20sig..JPG[/img]

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    Try getting the book "Carnivorous Plants of the United States and Canada". It will give you a selection and discriptions of hardy carnivorous plants (also, it has great pictures). Zongyi
    What you want to do is illeagle here in Canada.
    Email does not work! Use PM or yangzongyi@hotmail.com instead.

  5. #13

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    Thanks all, I am most appreciative.

    Starman, I will use your list as my base and will probably add a few more. Saves me worrying about what is hardy and what isn't. I have no doubt you have forgotten more than I have ever known anyway.

    I recently received Peter D'Amato's book as a gift. I called Borders and ordered "Carnivorous Plants of the United States and Canada" by Donald Schnell. They stated it would take 10-14 days to come in. I understand these two publications are about the best of the best for a CP neophyte.

    Capslock & pond boy- Kids DO LOVE Venus Flytraps. Great suggestion. My kids loved their VF so much they fed it virtually anything and everything to include small "set aside" portions of their McDonalds hamburgers. It did not survive all the well intended attention. I was not aware a VF could survive being overwintered in this area outside. Am I mistaken? Is the list provided that of VFs that would be hardy here?

    Squirrels are not so much of a problem these days. The endangered red squirrel was being out competed for resources by the gray squirrel and some restoration conservationists began culling the gray squirrels to better enable the red squirrel an opportunity to re-establish. I'm not saying I agree but I am also not saying I disagree. Deer are also being culled by the DNR in my area which is a welcome relief as they do have a tendency to browse now don't they. I have lost more plants to deer than I care to acknowledge and hopefully the CPs will not be yet another casualty of browse.

    Around me, the biggest issue is the feral/stray cats. They dig up everything and I am constantly running into their fecal matter. Ugh. They have gotten into my little bog a few times and this displeases me to no end. I have been trying to use Deer Off and red cayenne pepper to deter them. Not much more I can do. The school has stray cats everywhere too so I had just planned on buying Deer Off and a bulk size container of either chili powder or red pepper for them too.

    I never thought of birds being an issue. Thank you so much for mentioning it. We have hundreds and hundreds of English House Sparrows and they do rely upon insects to feed their nestlings. And those darn European Starlings that flock by the thousands around here. I forgot that more than half of the adult Starling's diet consists of insects and spiders. The parasitic nature of these two species of birds alone is going to be a major issue. I never anticipated this and therefore did not plan for same. We can't even seed our lawns around here without them appearing out of no where as if somebody rang a dinner bell. They descend and eat virtually every last seed. What do I do? My area is inundated with these horribly invasive exotic birds. What type of fencing do you all recommend? I am going to have to buy something to exclude the birds for both myself and for the school. There is no way any of these plants will make it given the sheer numbers of these species in this area. You have no idea how grateful I am that this issue was raised.

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    There are many cold hardy utrics out there (some even make hibernaculas for winter), and if grown right, they can easily combat moss. They have no problem with sphagnum.

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    Hello Spectabilis-
    I found these listed as being present in several non disclosed natural communities somewhere in my actual county-
    Utricularia cornuta HORNED BLADDERWORT
    Utricularia gibba HUMPED BLADDERWORT
    Utricularia intermedia FLAT-LEAVEDBLADDERWORT
    Utricularia minor SMALL BLADDERWORT
    Utricularia vulgaris COMMOM BLADDERWORT

    Thank you for the suggestion.

  8. #16

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    Sorry to dissapoint you Laura, but all of them are aquatics.
    I do not knwo about U.cornuta, but I think I have seen that name in the aquatic Utric section in my CP book.
    If you wish to grow these utrics, constructing a large pond woudl be nessecery for U.vulgairs, and a small pond woudl be nessecery for U.gibba and other small varieties.
    Carnivorous plants growlist:http://www.**********.com/cgi-bin....t=17597
    Onda je sultan pao mrtav do kostura

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