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Thread: Keeping water in the bottom of a terrarium

  1. #9
    Let's positive thinking! seedjar's Avatar
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    Well, I don't know about you, but if there's something in water that would prevent anything from growing or living in it, I wouldn't want it anywhere near my plants. Bleach perhaps? I read recently that keeping decaying sedge litter in water prevents the growth of algae - maybe that's what you're looking for? I saw it in a post about aldrovanda - try searching the last month's posts.
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    I keep all the plants in my terrarium in separate saucers. Under the saucers I have eggcrate, which has water underneath it to increase humidity. I use tap water for the humidification, which has chlorine in it. Since it simply evaporates, I can't imagine it hurting the plants, but it should help to kill bacteria/algae, etc. I also let the "humidification water" dry up between refills to further reduce contamination.

    You can keep purified water in the saucers for most plants, Nepenthes and Heliamphora being the main exceptions. If you can't reach the saucers to fill them, try using a funnel.

    Basically I use this system because it is easy to maintain, which is one of my primary goals. I can definitely understand not wanting to take all your plants out of the terrarium. I almost never take mine out, and they are doing great with this system.

    -Ben

  3. #11
    It's been one of dem days BigCarnivourKid's Avatar
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    I would change the water in the bottom of the tank for a couple reasons. 1) It will look better if the water doesn't have gunk growing in it. 2) Minerals from your water will gradually build up in the water in the terrarium. The build up will be slowest if your using distilled water and fastest if you are using tap water. The mineral build up won't bother your plants as long as they aren't sitting in the water, but they will eventually begin to form deposits along the sides of the terrarium.
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    I doubt you would want to put bleach in the terrarium. That would kill everything.
    There is nothing you can really do. If air circulation is fine the plants will proibily fine

  5. #13
    apple rings.. what more can i say? FlytrapGurl's Avatar
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    I have my D. adelae, N. ventricosa and P. primuliflora in a 29-gallon, all raised up off the floor of the tank on top of upside-down pots (to get them closer to the light), all with trays under them, and there's a thin layer of gravel in the bottom of the tank, which I pour a half-inch layer of water on for humidity. When most of that evaporates, I pour more.
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    When I first setup my four terraria, I placed a 2" thick layer of dried long-fibered sphagnum moss at the bottom and thoroughly drenched it with distilled water. I then setup the rest of the terrarium (lights, fan, plants.) The plants are individually potted and placed in plastic saucers standing on the sphagnum moss. I keep the moss wet by adding water as necessary until the moss layer is barely submerged under distilled water.

    One year later, the dead-looking sphagnum moss is a nice lime green and thriving (growing)! That's right....the dead-looking moss you buy actually has many moss spores and if given the appropriate conditions, they will germinate. This serves three purposes. 1) The moss is a natural competetor of algae and molds/fungus--I have never had to change the water at the bottom of my terraria. 2) The moss holds water and provides my plants with constant humidity. 3) Most importantly, makes the bottom of the tank look like a bog....it is so aesthetically pleasing to see my CPs growing in the comfort of my house in what appears to be a bog!

    Two notes if you attempt this: 1) You must provide the wetted moss with light shortly after initially placing it in the tank....if kept completely dark for 3 days or more it will mold. 2) water only with distilled (or comparable) water...just like you would with your CPs.

    Good luck with your terrarium.
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    StifflerMichael's Avatar
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    To keep the water clear in the bottom of the terrarium: Actually, there are certain products laboratories use for keeping microbes from growing in their warm water baths. It's not bleach. I was just wondering if anyone had heard of some other product that could be bought not through a laboratory vendor.

  8. #16
    War. War never changes. Est's Avatar
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    Well, this is just in my case, and I realize it may be unusual, but I have no problem. I don't have 2 inches, but I have enough water at the bottom of my tank as to where it should be causing the problems that you're worried about. I think as long as you watch it, it'll be ok. My water only occasionally gets the funk. Just use your nose and eyes to check on the water. I'd be more worried about the plants, anyway, as some may not appreciate the extra water, but that depends on what you're growing in there and their substrate.
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