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Thread: what kind of nep is this?

  1. #9
    future nursury owner...i hope CP_dude's Avatar
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    i think the higher the altitude the lower the humidity because the moisture just goes up...but in low elevation, it gets stuck in the thick vegetation and the humidity remains high (this is a compleat guess...but i guess it kinda makes sence...)

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    abcat1993's Avatar
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    Why would the moisture "just go up"? My guess is that the higher temps at low altitudes holds more humidity.

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    Always a newbie glider14's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CP_dude View Post
    i think the higher the altitude the lower the humidity because the moisture just goes up...but in low elevation, it gets stuck in the thick vegetation and the humidity remains high (this is a compleat guess...but i guess it kinda makes sence...)
    you look at the ultra highland species and the ones close to it(rajah, lowii, villosa, macrophylla, ect.) they have super high humidity in the wild and (for the most part) need it in cultivation. i say for the most part because there are the exceptions... there is a change in the highlands from day to night humidity wise. the main reason the lowlands are so humid is because of evaporation from the hot sun.
    Alex
    Everything is explainable. The seemingly unexplainable is but a result of our insufficient knowledge.- Hans Brewer

  4. #12
    Stay chooned in for more! Clint's Avatar
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    Air is a fluid. Just like the ocean, there are more molecules at the bottom since it's under pressure from what is on top. Warm air can hold more actual water molecules as a gas and that is what RH is. If you take warm air with a RH of anything given, say 80%, and cool it, the RH will go up since cool air holds less water vapor than warm air. The same amout of vapor is there, but now it is more concentrated and is at a higher RH%. Dry air (low RH) can cool things off faster through evaporation than cool air by the way. That's how evaporate cooling (swamp coolers, sweating) works. As air is heated, it rises and cools, the RH rises and condenses into clouds once it is high and cool enough, it rains, you know the story.

    When you try to visualize this, think of the heat waves generated from a grill or hot asphalt. That is a perfect example of how air is a fluid.



    Wow that was pretty hard to articulate. I hope I helped out a bit. By the way, since the air is thinner at high altitudes that's why it's cooler. Fewer molecules to hold the heat.

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