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Thread: Drosera ID

  1. #1
    The Most Uncreative Name in the History of Ever Plant Planter's Avatar
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    Question Drosera ID

    The one with the Uncreative Name has returned with another question. (I have sooooooo many questions. )

    If any of you who currently are reading this have stumbled upon my Interactive Grow List and Eat Counts and/or my photo thread, you would know that I have a lovely Drosera spatulata (or Drosera spathulata, does it really matter? Someone probably is going to come out and say it does.) which I have owned for about three months.

    Well, I was checking that the hyperlinks on my Interactive Grow List and Eat Counts were working, and I clicked on the one for Drosera spatulata. The machine Googled it for me, as usual, and for some reason I clicked on the ICPS link for D. spatulata and how to grow its species group. At the bottom of the page was a picture of a Drosera tokaiensis (previously thought to be a variation of D. spatulata), which had leaves that looked almost EXACTLY like my plant's leaves. Here's a side-by-side comparison. The top picture is my plant, and the bottom one is said D. tokaiensis.




    The description for D. tokaiensis also fits.

    "Drosera tokaiensis is easy to grow and tends to become a weed."

    Well, mine certainly has been easy to grow, and it's flowering a lot. The flowers also look like these, which supposedly are from a D. tokaiensis. (I say supposedly since it came from Wikipedia.)



    Well, my plant isn't going to tell me what it is, so I guess I'll just need to find out!

    I would greatly appreciate if anyone could confirm or disprove my thinking, as well as any facts, opinions, observations, personal anecdotes, blah blah blah yada yada yada etc. etc. etc. about these two plants!

    (End of five-minute anomalous formality. )

  2. #2
    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
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    D. rotundastickya or maybe D. spatuhaha?
    Grand Hotel... always the same. People come, people go. Nothing ever happens.

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    hcarlton's Avatar
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    The plant you grow is likely the so-called D. "spathulata" sold at just about any garden nursery. It has the tokaiensis-style leaves, many, many, MANY often bifurcating flower stalks and pink flowers that may or may not open, yes? If so, then I am guessing this plant is likely D. x tokaiensis, which I believe is the plant I also have labeled as a typical spatulata (and need to change the label of). From my experience, this thing flowers readily and does become very weedy, though never produces seeds. I have a fertile flowering form in the same pot too, and they look very similar.
    Everything has a reason, whether big or small. Never underestimate the power of what is or is not.
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    The Most Uncreative Name in the History of Ever Plant Planter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hcarlton View Post
    The plant you grow is likely the so-called D. "spathulata" sold at just about any garden nursery. It has the tokaiensis-style leaves, many, many, MANY often bifurcating flower stalks and pink flowers that may or may not open, yes? If so, then I am guessing this plant is likely D. x tokaiensis, which I believe is the plant I also have labeled as a typical spatulata (and need to change the label of). From my experience, this thing flowers readily and does become very weedy, though never produces seeds. I have a fertile flowering form in the same pot too, and they look very similar.
    I've heard of Drosera spatulata subsp. tokaiensis, but never of Drosera x tokaiensis. But your description does fit my plant. (Actually, the plant tag on it when I bought it was the so-called D. spathulata.) It does have MANY bifurcated flower stalks, probably about ten, and maybe forty percent don't open. It also is very weedy and it very overcrowding its pot.

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    The Most Uncreative Name in the History of Ever Plant Planter's Avatar
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    Why am I making so many double posts?

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    Yes, the subspecies status applied before they found out it was actually a hybrid. Like I stated before, there are now 2 known varieties: the very common and weedy yet infertile (probably better that way) sterile hybrid, which resulted originally from a cross of D. spatulata x rotundifolia, and the amphiploid species tokaiensis that is fertile. I have both in the same pot now, like I said above, and both look very similar. Though I have to admit, the species does not multiply like the hybrid does.
    Everything has a reason, whether big or small. Never underestimate the power of what is or is not.
    There is far more to everything than meets the eye.
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    Quote Originally Posted by hcarlton View Post
    ...Like I stated before, there are now 2 known varieties: the very common and weedy yet infertile (probably better that way) sterile hybrid, which resulted originally from a cross of D. spatulata x rotundifolia...
    I can see how it's descended from Drosera rotundifolia. It probably is better that it hasn't made seeds yet, or else it would take over my collection.

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