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Thread: BE-3519 aristo X hairy hamata ?

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    BE-3519 aristo X hairy hamata ?

    Hello all.

    I just purchased this BE-3519 N. aristolochioides X RHH from my favorite local supplier. I think it is really pretty, however, I am not entirely convinced that this particular plant contains aristo genes. All of the other BE-3519 that were available looked a lot different than mine. I have attached a picture of mine (tall pitcher) and a picture of another to compare it to. The rosette on mine is smaller than the other plant, and the pitcher is larger. I am interested to hear the thoughts of others. Thank you I wonder if I ended up with a different hybrid.. I should have bought both plants! They are so cool

    [IMG][/IMG][IMG][/IMG]

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    Plant Whisperer Bio's Avatar
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    Pics of the rosette would be helpful. I agree that they don't look to be the same, but could variability or a mix-up explain it?
    I see a lot of singalana in your plant. N. singalana x hamata maybe?

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    clippity-clip-clip Clue's Avatar
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    IMO it's pretty much futile to try and guess the parentage of small, recently purchased, recent crosses. The best thing to do is grow it out. If I recall correctly, many Sumatran Nepenthes have very similar foliage, including N. singalana and N. talangensis, so rosette pictures may not clarify any situation. BE has a photo of BE-3519 on their photo catalog, but again, it's a much more mature plant.

    EDIT: You could also contact the nursery you purchased it from and check if they had any N. singalana x hamata "Red Hairy" plants... I imagine that it's much more likely that in the process of potting them up after importing, the nursery mixed them up and not BE, considering BE's good track record.
    Last edited by Clue; 06-18-2014 at 08:41 PM.
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    villosaholic Heli's Avatar
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    That definitely shows aristo traits, the bottom picture especially. I wouldnt doubt the parentage of the plant, BE rarely makes mistakes like that.
    Edit: Looking through your post I see that the bottom one is not actually yours lol. That being said, I think the top one is either singalana x rhh or aristo x rhh, I am leaning towards aristo x rhh merely because it is not often that BE makes a mistake like that, and hybrids sometimes have unusual traits.
    Last edited by Heli; 06-18-2014 at 08:31 PM.

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    NatchGreyes's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Clue View Post
    IMO it's pretty much futile to try and guess the parentage of small, recently purchased, recent crosses. The best thing to do is grow it out. If I recall correctly, many Sumatran Nepenthes have very similar foliage, including N. singalana and N. talangensis, so rosette pictures may not clarify any situation. BE has a photo of BE-3519 on their photo catalog, but again, it's a much more mature plant.

    EDIT: You could also contact the nursery you purchased it from and check if they had any N. singalana x hamata "Red Hairy" plants... I imagine that it's much more likely that in the process of potting them up after importing, the nursery mixed them up and not BE, considering BE's good track record.
    I agree with Clue. In my experience, the aristo hybrids grow very quickly, so you should be able to make a positive ID within a year. That being said, I have (allegedly) an aristo x (vent x spec) which produces a radically different pitcher each time it has produced a pitcher for me. So, you might have to wait for the pitcher morphology to stabilize.

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