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Thread: Poi Dog Nepenthes

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    nimbulan's Avatar
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    Poi Dog Nepenthes

    This was my first Nepenthes that I bought to see how well I could grow one. As I discovered, like most CPs, the difficulty of growing them is exaggerated and I have acquired several others since but have never positively identified this one. So have at it, Nepenthes experts!

    Pitchers are pretty dark red (darker than it looks in the picture), with some slightly darker speckling and are approximately 4" tall, producing UV-reactive nectar. Pitchers are extremely long-lived as I am pretty sure there are still pitchers on the plant from more than a year ago that still look decent. The plant is reluctant to produce pitchers in the winter, but also does not seem to care much about changing conditions while other easier-pitchering plants will lose their pitchers with even small disturbances. Leaves are slightly V-shaped and grow upward from the stem with a usual length of about 6", with some reaching 7". Tendril tips tend to be extremely fuzzy, and I have not noticed any tendency for the tendrils to curl or wrap themselves around other objects.








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    hcarlton's Avatar
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    The thought that came to me originally was perhaps something along the lines of ventricosa x singalana (like 'Bill Bailey'); however, as I was typing my reply a different thought struck me and I looked it up, and the cross looks more or less identical: ventricosa x angasanensis. A certain Hawaiian nursery (where the "Poi Dog" name originated and thereby where I'm guessing this plant came from) does grow that hybrid, and both the leaves and pitchers are a match.
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    nimbulan's Avatar
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    It is very likely the plant originated there as I know the nursery I purchased this plant from gets stock from there. I was only able to find one picture of the ventricosa x angasanensis from their collection, unfortunately. I wish there were a few others from other angles to get a better idea of the pitcher shape as I can't tell how closely it matches from just the one.

    Thanks for the information!

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    hcarlton's Avatar
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    N. ventricosa x angasanensis is originally an EP plant, so go to the CP Photo Finder, plenty of shots there (including from the "Poi" nursery, more than one photo)
    Everything has a reason, whether big or small. Never underestimate the power of what is or is not.
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    nimbulan's Avatar
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    Are you sure they have the EP clone? Looking at the pictures, I'm pretty sure it's a different clone as their plant has a far more pronounced "neck" and a much more bulbous base, as well as a thinner peristome and more contrast in color between the interior and exterior. I suppose it could be environmental differences, but every one of those pictures looks the same except the single poi dog picture, though it's hard to tell due to the angle of that picture.

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    hcarlton's Avatar
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    I doubt there was just one clone released when EP made the cross... and yes, a lot of what you just mentioned could be environmental (the inside vs. outside pitcher color on yours is probably close to as much contrast as other shots, but because it's backlit outer pitcher color shows through the inner wall), or a genetically different clone of the same cross, but you also can't base such differences off the one pitcher you have shown here as any one pitcher might be rather variant from a norm. In any case, that's my best guess on this, anyone else is welcome to chime in with a different answer as I'm sure other hybrids (especially complex ones) might produce a similar plant, but to my eyes it's too close...
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    clippity-clip-clip Clue's Avatar
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    I have grown N. ventricosa x angasanensis in the past and its tendrils were not hairy. N. angasanensis is almost glabratous and something in this plant's parentage must be very hairy to override N. ventricosa. I don't think we'll get a conclusive answer with this plant, many N. ventricosa crosses really do look too similar superficially.
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    hcarlton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Clue View Post
    I have grown N. ventricosa x angasanensis in the past and its tendrils were not hairy. N. angasanensis is almost glabratous and something in this plant's parentage must be very hairy to override N. ventricosa. I don't think we'll get a conclusive answer with this plant, many N. ventricosa crosses really do look too similar superficially.
    The hair on the tendrils pictured is close enough to ventricosa (half a dozen different plants here that all have a notable indumentum on the tendril and pitcher bud), so nothing needs to be particularly hairy for that to show up in the hybrid. Even rather glabrous plants can produce hybrids with ventricosa displaying a covering of that density. It can't be described as "hairy" per se especially as much of the indumentum is dropped as pitchers developed, but it is present.
    Everything has a reason, whether big or small. Never underestimate the power of what is or is not.
    There is far more to everything than meets the eye.
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