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Thread: Hello, intro., help me identify neps?

  1. #9

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    Hey that last one looks like N. Coccinea. I don't have a "spotted Alata", so I could be wrong. Something tells me its N. Coccinea though! [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/tounge.gif[/img]

    SF

  2. #10

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    Here's a low quality (or bad photographer [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/smile.gif[/img] ) pic of my N. Coccinea. See the similarity?
    [img]http://home.**********.com/snowyfalcon/HTML/images/Image14b.jpg[/img]

  3. #11

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    I agree with SnowyFalcon. That is N. coccinea. The one you think is highland alata is actually a hybrid called N. 'Miranda', which is most likely the cross of N. maxima x N. mixta. The plant you're looking at as a lowland alata is actually N. ventrata, the hybrid of N. alata x N. ventricosa.
    The N. 'Miranda' will produce pitchers almost a foot long once the plant gets up in size. Also, as the pitcher matures, the peristome will loose the striping and turn a solid deep red.

    Trent

  4. #12

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    Post

    Here are a few photos of my N. X ventrata






    My largest pitcher so far.


    Variation of the pitchers on the plant.


    Young pitcher.





    Nick

    Careful where you crawl, it might be a trap!

    http://www.carnivorium.com
    http://www.buckeyecarnivores.com

  5. #13

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    Pix of relevant nepenthes from NL I think youze guys are pretty smart. I'd give you two out of three. Of course I was 1/2 of 3 with liberal grading. Partial credit.

    I still think my "lowland alata" is one, which would still only get me 1/2 point. Drat! The pitchers don't 'collar,' for lack of a better term, red. I agree, the shape is almost identical, and the particular photo I used makes it look like the pitcher is going to turn red on top. They don't however. The tops brown first, but not redden especially. The largest pitcher (only just over 4") is all green.

  6. #14

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    Actually, I'd say that these plants "collar," oh well, exactly like those reddish "green" alata in the Netherlands do. It's there very faintly, but the red never even quite gets to what is visible on the left pitcher in Nick's useful photo showing three pitchers together. Then, the area reddens with the rest of the pitcher if at all.

    This photo actually shows pitchers from both plants from the same little nursery. It shows the biggest green pitcher from the one plant. It's seen better days.

    Whatever the green-red pitcher plant is, it is the clear champion at eating bugs. The local bugs seem to jump in.

    Perhaps mine are sick or not as mature, therefore not reddening around the tops? Dunno.

    Here's the best angle I could get with multiple larger pitchers for now. Some have browned from the top. One on the right looks a bit misleading. It's actually brown on the top. It looks more reddish in this pic.

    [img]http://home.**********.com/beagle/pitchcomparo.jpg[/img]

  7. #15
    Tony Paroubek's Avatar
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    Beagle - The page your linking to with the N. 'alata' is picturing a N. xVentrata. Your plant is also a N. xVentrata. It has been labelled N. alata for the past 20 years and is still being mass produced in Europe and sold as such today.

    Growing conditions will greatly affect coloration. The difference you see will probably diminish as the two plants settle in to your growing area.

    I had posted a reply in a different thread on difference between N. alata, N. ventricosa and N. xVentrata but not sure where it went. Basically the pointed folds in the peristome are characteristic for N. ventricosa and not N. alata. N. alata has a clear petiole. The tapering of the leaf blade all the way down to the stem is characteristic of N. ventricosa. There are other differences but these are the easier ones to look for.
    Tony
    Is that a Nepenthes in your pocket or you just happy to see me?

  8. #16

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    Thanks, Tony.

    So, In summation:

    1) N. coccinea

    2) N. 'Miranda' which is probably N. maxima x N. mixta

    3) N. ventrata which is a European 'alata' but is N. alata x N. ventricosa.

    If that's it then I'm up to speed. Thanks to everyone. Glad there was no actual money wagered. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/smile.gif[/img]

    I guess if I know what I have, it's time to get MORE! Heh.

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